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All Stories: 742

Historical Marker #2473 commemorates the portion of Boone Trace leaving the relatively level Laurel County area into the mountainous and remote Rockcastle County area which became quite arduous for the Daniel Boone and his trailblazing party during…

Historical Marker #2149 recognizes Ora Frances Porter, an influential figure in Bowling Green’s African-American community, who was among the earliest registered nurses in Kentucky. Born in Butler County in 1880, Porter’s family moved to Bowling…

Historical Marker #1063 commemorates the Old Union Missionary Baptist Church, considered to be the oldest, continuous congregation in Warren County. When the Kentucky Legislature passed an act in 1795 granting each settler the right to own 200 acres…

Historical Marker #2327 is erected on the present day grounds of the First Baptist Church in Garrard County. Organized in 1851, the current church was built in 1871 and was the first Baptist church for the slaves in the county. Pre-dating…

Historical Marker #2273 is located on the lawn of the house that was built by Thomas Buford around 1820. Buford was the son of William Buford, the founder of the county seat of Garrard County, Lancaster. William donated the land for the town, which…

Historical Marker # 2026 is located on highway KY 52 at mile point 11 in Garrard County in commemoration of folk singer Bradley Kincaid. The “Kentucky Mountain Boy” recorded over two hundred songs and published thirteen songbooks during his…

Historical Marker #1942 is erected on the present site of the First Presbyterian Church in Lancaster, Kentucky. Built in 1879, the church was first formed in 1816 with only twenty two members. William O. Bradley, the first Republican Governor of…

Historical Marker # 1733 located about four miles away from the prohibition advocate’s birthplace on Carry Nation Road in Lancaster, Kentucky. Nation was born in Garrard County on November 25, 1846 as Carry Amelia Moore. She and her family moved…

Historical Marker # 1617 is placed at the present Baptist church that was built in 1850, the foundation of which was built from stones of the previous church erected in 1823. Located on Highway 27, about seven miles from Lancaster, the church was…

Historical Marker #1525 marks the site of the settlement and fort named Paint Lick built by Lieutenant Colonel William Miller. The fort’s lands are now bordered by highways 52 and 21 through the small town. Colonel William Miller was born in…

Historical Marker #1371 is located at the Fork of Dix River Baptist Church cemetery and marks the burial site of Revolutionary War veteran, James Thompson. Before Kentucky separated from Virginia and became a state in 1792, Thompson was appointed by…

Historical Marker #1240 describes the founding of Garrard County, the twenty-fifth county formed in the state. Named for James Garrard, an early governor for Kentucky, it was formed from three surrounding counties, Lincoln, Mercer, and…

Historical Marker #714 indicates the house (added to the original log cabin from 1798) in which several congressmen and other important gentleman were said to have lived. Those men included Governor William Owsley, Robert P. Letcher, George…

Historical Marker #704 is installed on US 27 at Bryantsville. The plaque both marks the location of a Confederate supply depot that was moved from Lexington in September 1862 and to note the retreat of Confederate soldiers under the command of…

Historical Marker #699 denotes the gothic revival-style house that was built in the 1850s by Allen A. Burton, a Lancaster Attorney and Lincoln’s minister to Columbia. The marker is no longer on the property on which the house of William Bradley…

Historical Marker #562 in Franklin commemorates Jerome Clarke, who is said to have impersonated a woman to spy on the enemy during the Civil War. There are various ways to win a war, perhaps none as crucial as having spies infiltrate the enemy lines.…

Historical Marker #2467 commemorates the Daviess County United States Colored Troops in the Civil War. In 1864, several hundred enslaved African American men joined the Union army in Daviess County. Many black recruits from surrounding counties…

Historical Marker #978 in Simpson County notes the birthplace of US Representative and Senator Virgil Munday Chapman. Kentucky has produced its fair share of politicians who made a name for themselves on the national stage. Some are better…

Historical Marker #1850 in Simpson County notes the irregular boundary protrusion that occurs on the Kentucky-Tennessee state line where Interstate 65 crosses the border. Looking at almost any map of the United States, it is easy to see the…

Historical Marker #503 in Simpson County notes the unique architecture of Octagon Hall, an eight-sided home built in the mid-nineteenth century. Regardless of era, wealth has always had its privileges. If one has the necessary funds, lifestyle…

Historical Marker #611 in Simpson County notes the location where Tennessee antagonists sometimes met to settle affairs of honor by fighting duels. When a gentleman in the late-eighteenth or early-nineteenth century was publicly humiliated by a…

Historical Marker #2345 in Franklin remembers the Lincoln School, which served as that city’s African American school from 1940-1965. During the “Jim Crow” era, funding for African American schools in southern states often had to come from a…

Historical Marker #1369 in Franklin notes the Goodnight Memorial Library’s founding and long service to the community. One never knows how many lives may be impacted through charitable giving, but almost always, good comes from giving. Such was…

Historical Marker #598 in Simpson County notes the movement of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry while in the area during the Confederate invasion of Kentucky during the summer and fall of 1862. In the summer of 1862, John Hunt Morgan made a raid…

Historical Marker #912 in Franklin notes Simpson County’s namesake, War of 1812 veteran, Captain John Simpson. Simpson, a native of Virginia, came to Kentucky as child with his family. The Simpsons settled in Lincoln County and John attended a…

Historical Marker #2132 in Franklin remembers the birthplace of noted church hymnist Thomas Obadiah Chisholm. T.O. Chisholm was born into a turbulent world on July 29, 1866. The Civil War had ended the year before, but yet random acts of violence…

Historical Marker #1271 in Franklin remembers the service of politician Beverly Leonidas Clarke to the state and nation. Beverly L. Clarke was born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, in 1809. In 1823, he moved with his family to Christian County,…

Historical Marker #2402 in Franklin notes the birthplace of Alexander Majors, a co-founder of the Pony Express. Long before Horace Greely coined the phrase “Go West, young man!” generations had already started looking toward the western…

Historical Marker #1947 in Simpson County remembers native son James Bowie, who died at the Alamo in 1836, and that county’s 1869 redrawn boundary with neighboring Logan County. “Remember the Alamo!” is a phrase that has been passed down…

Historical marker #1517 in Whitley County celebrates the Kiwanis Trail that connects Corbin to the Cumberland Falls. The Cumberland Falls is a large waterfall in southeastern Kentucky. On October 21, 1921, the Corbin Kiwanis Club was founded and…

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