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All Stories: 631

Historical Marker #1980 marks the location of Benham Shaw’s pioneer settlement and the Beaver Dam Creek Baptist Church. Benham (Bonum) Shaw originally settled near Elizabethtown around 1779 with a group of Baptist settlers. Shaw was a ruling…

Historical Marker #1828 notes the town of Millerstown, which was settled before 1800. Millerstown is the oldest settlement in Grayson County. Founded by Jacob Miller in the late eighteenth century, Millerstown was originally called Skaggs after…

Historical Marker #1741 notes some important landmarks in Leitchfield, the county seat of Grayson County. Founded in 1810, Leitchfield was named for Major David Leitch of Campbell County. Leitch was an aide-de-camp to General Robert Lawson of…

Historical Marker #1634 marks the earliest brick residence in Grayson County, as well as one of the oldest brick structures in west-central Kentucky. The Jack Thomas House was originally a one-story, two-room, brick building that was erected by…

Historical Marker #1602 marks one of the oldest brick houses in Grayson County. The transitional Greek Revival house located in Rogers Springs was built in 1847 by Benjamin Lone Rogers. Rogers was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, in 1812 to…

Historical Marker #1592 commemorates George Eskridge who settled in Grayson County around 1811. “Kentucky George” Eskridge, born in Virginia in 1763, served in the American Revolution before settling in what is now Grayson County. Called…

Historical Marker #906 marks the spot of the Green Sawmill in the small town of Falls of Rough. Willis Green II was born in Virginia, was a member of the Whig Party, and was a district campaign manager for Henry Clay when Clay ran for president.…

Historical Marker #873 notes the naming of Grayson County for Colonel William Grayson, an aide to General George Washington during the Revolutionary War. George Washington purchased five thousand acres on the southern shore of Rough River in…

Historical Marker# 768 marks the site of a famous sulfur spa and resort in Grayson County. Grayson Springs began in the mid 1820s and was owned and operated by M.P. Clarkson. Opened from May 1 until October 1 each year, it flourished from 1825…

Historical Marker #589 commemorates when the Leitchfield courthouse was burned during the Civil War. Twenty- two courthouses were burned during the Civil War. Most were purposely destroyed while some met an unfortunate accident. The Leitchfield…

Historical Marker #212 marks five thousand acres of land owned by George Washington in present-day Grayson County. These five thousand acres in Grayson County was the only land in Kentucky owned by General George Washington. The deed to the land…

Historical Marker #1873 marks the location of Bethabara Church, organized by dismissed members of Panther Creek Baptist Church, the first church in Daviess County. Bethabara Church was organized on October 5, 1825. Beginning as a log house, it…

Historical Marker #1843 marks the former site of Thruston Elementary School. It was named in honor of Algernon Sidney Thruston. Born in Jefferson County in 1801, Thruston was nine months old when his father died. His inheritance, two hundred…

Historical Marker #1747 in Daviess County commemorates the first Kentuckian to receive an award for more than seventy years of service with the Boy Scouts of America. As a youth living in Detroit, Hazen Dean first joined the Boy Scouts in 1913.…

Historical Marker #1456 commemorates the 1,747 men who served from Daviess County during World War I, between April 1917 and November 1918. Kentucky enlisted more than 80,000 men in the Armed Forces for the First World War. With more than 1,700…

Historical Marker # 1436 at the Owensboro courthouse honors George Graham Vest, who began Owensboro’s second newspaper in 1852. Vest was born on December 6, 1830, in Frankfort, Kentucky. He moved to Owensboro around 1852, where he edited the…

Historical Marker # 1333 marks the birthplace of Albert Smith Marks, the twenty-fourth governor for Tennessee. Born in Daviess County, Kentucky, Marks lived in Kentucky until he was nineteen years old. In 1850, at age fourteen, Marks’s father…

Historical Marker #1307 marks the site of the first “road” in the wilderness. This path allowed settlers to follow the trail to the site of present-day Owensboro. Herds of buffalo walked along this stretch, created the trail, and led to it being…

Historical Marker #1183 commemorates three Daviess County Confederate soldiers who were honored by Confederate President Jefferson Davis during the Civil War. Albert M. Hathaway, John L. Bell, and Mathias Garrett were three of seventy-two Kentucky…

Historical Marker #1918 commemorates the Hawes family and their contributions to Daviess County’s history, particularly in the Yelvington area. Richard and Clary Hawes settled in the Yelvington/Maceo area in 1810. They arrived three years…

Historical Marker #1081 marks the site of property that belonged to George Mason, the author of the Virginia Bill of Rights and Constitution. Although he owned about 60,000 acres of land in Daviess County, he died in 1792 without ever having visited…

Historical Marker #883 marks the home of Colonel Joseph Hamilton Daviess, a farm called “Cornland”, located on the Ohio River a mile and a half east of Owensboro. The original residence was a hewn log house, although none of that remains…

Historical Marker #744 marks the site of the first permanent settlement in Owensboro, settled by Bill Smothers (also known as Bill Smeathers) in 1797-98. Bill Smothers served in Kentucky’s “Corn Stalk Militia” as an ensign before becoming a…

Historical Marker #590, located on the courthouse lawn, notes the burning of the Daviess County courthouse on January 4, 1865, by a band of Civil War guerrillas. Formerly a captain in the 7th Kentucky Union Infantry Regiment, William "Bill"…

Historical marker #1950 in McLean County commemorates the life of Charles Hansford, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Around 1730, Charles Hansford’s grandfather immigrated to America and settled in King George County, Virginia. In 1759,…

Historical marker #1812 in McLean County celebrates the life of William Worthington. On May 7, 1761, Worthington was born in Frederick County, Virginia. He married Mary (Meason) Worthington. In 1784, the couple moved from Virginia to Kentucky.…

Historical Marker #1123 in McLean County details the early history and naming of the county and the county’s seat of Calhoun. In 1854, Kentucky established McLean County by combining parts of Daviess, Muhlenberg, and Ohio counties. This county…

Historical marker #892 in McLean County commemorates uniqueness of the Livermore Bridge. The Livermore Bridge does not contain a distinctive architectural structure or a one of a kind design. However, the bridge is like no other bridge in the…

Historical marker #830 in McLean County commemorates the Union camp site of the 35th Kentucky Infantry. On September 26, 1863, the 35th Kentucky (Union) Infantry was organized at Owensboro, Kentucky. Although the regiment was mounted, it was never…

Historic marker #665 in McLean County relates the reconnaissance mission Confederate Colonel Nathan B. Forrest led into the area. In the fall of 1861, Federal troops, led by Brigadier General Thomas L. Crittenden, took position in Calhoun. The…

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