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ExploreKYHistory

All Stories: 458

Historical Marker #1193 in Owingsville notes the history of the Owings House and it original owner, Thomas Deye Owings. Before the town of Owingsville was founded, most of the surrounding land was owned by either politician Richard Menefee or…

Historical Marker #1342 at Olympian Springs in Bath County notes the history of this fashionable and well-attended resort, which served patrons for more than one hundred years. The fascination with mineral springs and their perceived curative…

Historical Marker #1542, near Bethel in Bath County, remembers the life of one of Kentucky's most notable newspaper writers. Joe Cross Creason was born in Benton, Kentucky, on June 10, 1918. After graduating from the University of Kentucky, and…

Historical Marker #592 in Owingsville notes the accidental burning of the Bath County courthouse by Union troops in 1864. While the Civil War disrupted the lives of many Americans, those who lived in the border states, like Kentucky, often…

Historical Marker #1050 near the town of Salt Lick in Bath County remembers the prodigious output of Clear Creek Furnace. Built in 1839 by W. A. Lane and W. S. Allen, the furnace operated until its last blast in 1875. Production of iron at the…

Historical Marker #1528 in Owingsville provides a tribute to the life of Revolutionary War hero, Captain John "Jack" Jouett, Jr. Jack Jouett was born in Virginia on December 7, 1754. During the Revolutionary War, Jouett served as captain in the…

Historical Marker #1226 in Bath County includes a history of the furnace built on Caney Fork, a branch of the Licking River. Harrison Connor and Joshua Ewing, Sr., began constructing the Caney Furnace in 1837. Ewing operated the Bourbon Iron…

Historical Marker #993 in Bath County notes the history of the Bourbon Iron Works, which was built by Jacob Myers in 1791. Myers moved from Virginia to what would become Kentucky in the early 1780s. Upon his arrival, he purchased thousands of…

Historical Marker #940 in Owingsville notes several important and influential personalities from the history of Bath County. Founded in 1811, Bath County is named for its mineral and medicinal springs. The famous Olympian Springs resort was a…

Historical Marker # 1935 in Lewisport (Hancock County) commemorates the December 1864 capture of a Union mail packet steamboat at this Ohio River town by Confederate guerrillas. A sharp rise in pro-Confederate guerrilla activity in Kentucky…

Historical Marker #944 in Bardstown (Nelson County) commemorates steamboat innovator John Fitch, whose pioneering work helped set the stage for a transportation revolution. Fitch was born on January 21, 1743, in Windsor, Connecticut. He first…

Historical Marker #1264 in McLean County notes the namesake of the town of Rumsey. Kentucky claims strong ties to the steamboat. Early innovator John Fitch lived his last years in Bardstown, and Fulton and Livingston counties were named for…

Historical Marker #925 in Monterey notes that town's association with steamboat travel and trade on the Kentucky River. Monterey, in Owen County, was originally named Williamsburg after a local pioneer settler. In 1847, the town changed its name…

Historical Marker #1681 in Louisville remembers that city's close association with the time when steamboats ruled the Ohio River. Louisville's location at the Falls of the Ohio River made it a prime port location for early steamboat travel and…

Historical Marker #801 in Smithland commemorates the namesake of Livingston County, Robert R. Livingston. Robert Livingston was born in New York City in 1746. He was educated at King's College and studied law soon thereafter. Livingston was…

Historical Marker #1805 in Beattyville (Lee County) notes the location where the Kentucky River begins. Two branches, the North Fork and Middle Fork, join together east of Beattyville. They then form a confluence with the South Fork at the town,…

Historical Marker #1065 in Paducah—where the Tennessee River flows into the Ohio River—commemorates the importance of the waterfront to this river city. River towns often materialize near natural geographical distinctions. For example, cities…

Historical Marker #720 in Gallatin County notes the tragic steamboat collision between the "America" and the "United States" on the Ohio River in 1868. The disaster, which occurred near Warsaw, Kentucky, resulted in a significant loss of life and…

Historical Marker #1778 in Louisville remembers the final resting place of pioneering female steamboat captain Mary Millicent Miller, who received her license as a captain in 1884. The nineteenth century world of steamboating was often a rough and…

Historical Marker #1169 in Fulton explains that the county and town were both named for Robert Fulton, an early steamboat innovator. Fulton County's location on the Mississippi River in the southwest corner of Kentucky fits well with its namesake's…

Historical Marker #2265 in Owen County notes the historical significance of steamboat captain Samuel Sanders, who plied the waters of the Kentucky River for many years. Today, it is difficult to believe that steamboats once appeared in great…

Historical Marker #1756 in Hawesville (Hancock County) cites the birthplace of noted steamboat captain and builder John W. Cannon. Cannon captained steamboats on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers during much of the nineteenth century and became famous…

Historical Marker #2398 in Glasgow recognizes the first African American woman to earn a pilot’s license in the United States. Willa Brown Chappell, a Glasgow native, was influential in breaking through racial barriers in the aviation field…

Historical Marker #2397 in Glasgow notes the work of Nettie B. C. Depp , a pioneer in education. Having taught for several years, she ran on the Democratic ticket for county school superintendent in 1913 and became the first female public official…

Historical Marker # 2407 in Millersburg commemorates the Millersburg Military Institute (MMI), which was established in 1893. Colonel C. M. Best, a native of Virginia, founded the MMI in the former Kentucky Wesleyan College building on Main…

Historical Marker #2408 in Bourbon County remembers the Frankfort and Cincinnati Railroad and the Centerville depot. Although called the Frankfort and Cincinnati Railroad, the line only ran the 40 miles from Frankfort to Paris. It operated until…

Historical Marker #178 in Paris honors William Holmes McGuffey, creator of the famous "McGuffey Readers" textbooks. William H. McGuffey was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, in 1800. He spent his youth in that area, and adjoining Ohio,…

Historical Marker #82 in Bourbon County highlights the first home of James Garrard, the second governor of Kentucky. Governor James Garrard's first house, located on Stoner Creek, was called "Fairfield." It was constructed before 1785 and was…

Historical Marker #753 in Bourbon County marks the site of Mt. Gilead Methodist Meeting House, which was founded in 1792. The founder of Mt. Gilead, Caleb Jarvis Taylor, was born in Maryland in 1763, into the Roman Catholic faith. He left home at…

Historical Marker #1596 in Bourbon County gives the history of Silas Baptist Church in Bourbon County. Silas Baptist Church is located 12 miles from Paris at the junction of the Silas and Collins Pikes. The congregation was first organized…

Historical Marker #1462 in Bourbon County tells the story of Ruddle's Mill, one of Bourbon County's first industrial districts. The location of Isaac Ruddell's grist mill, the "mill seat," required legal authorization and a proper location for…

Historical Marker #150 in Bourbon County commemorates Martin's Station, an important frontier Kentucky settlement that was captured by British Captain Henry Byrd in 1780. John Martin, an early Kentucky pioneer who had spent time at Fort…

Historical Marker #2147 in Millersburg commemorates the many accomplishments of Minnie Mae Jones, who was born February 8, 1904, to a racially mixed mother and white father. As a child Mae Street Kidd was discriminated against by both white and…

Historical Marker #1141 in Bourbon County marks the birthplace of John Fox, Jr., born December 16, 1862, at Stony Point between Paris and Winchester. John Fox, Jr., the son of John Fox and his second wife, Minerva Carr, lived in Bourbon County…

Historical Marker #1283 in Bourbon County marks Johnston's Inn, which was illustrated on John Filson's 1784 map of Kentucky. Johston's Inn is recognized as the oldest house in Bourbon County. It is located on John Filson's famous 1784…

Historical Marker #1722 in Paris outlines John Edwards' contributions to the founding of the state of Kentucky and his prominence in early Bourbon County history. John Edwards was born in Stafford County, Virginia. After service in the…

Historical Marker #1855 in Paris tells the story of the Hopewell Presbyterian Church. Before becoming Paris, the town was called Hopewell. According to Collins' "History of Kentucky," a group of people from Cumberland County, Pennsylvania,…

Historical Marker #1886 in Paris highlights the life of politician Garrett Davis. Garrett Davis, statesman, excellent debater, and public servant, was born on September 10, 1801, at Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. Educated locally, Davis aspired to…

Historical Marker #2090 in Paris marks the current location of that town's First Christian Church. First Christian Church's location on a ridge near the center of town makes the red-tiled octagonal towers visible from a considerable distance. The…

Historical Marker #1493 in Paris highlights the accomplishments of American inventor Garrett Augustus Morgan, who was born the son of former slaves on March 4, 1877. Garrett Morgan grew up on the family farm while his father worked for the…

Historical Marker #2059 in Bourbon County marks the location of the death of Edward "Ned" Boone, the brother of Daniel Boone. In 1780, Daniel and Ned Boone were returning to Boone's Station located in present Fayette County, where Daniel lived…

Marker #1824 describes Eades Tavern, one of the oldest surviving buildings in Paris. It has served as tavern, post office, school, and private home. Thomas Eades built the log portion of Eades Tavern around 1795. The first travelers who stopped…

Historical Marker #93 in Paris describes the significance of Major Joseph Duncan's house and tavern. On the west side of the public square in Paris, Kentucky, stands Duncan Tavern, current Headquarters of the Kentucky Society of the Daughters of…

Historical Marker #696 in Paris tells the story of famed Confederate raider, John Hunt Morgan, who rode into Paris on July 18, 1862, after a furious battle that defeated a larger Union force the day before, 14 miles north at Cynthiana. Morgan…

Historical Marker #1566 in Bourbon County tells about the county's last remaining covered bridge, which is one of the few remaining in the state. The Colville Covered Bridge was constructed in 1877 by Jacob Bower of the Bower Bridge Company of…

Historical Marker #2178 in Bourbon County marks the Centerville Baptist Church, a historic African American congregation established in 1867. Before the Civil War, if enslaved individuals wished to participate in religious services they most…

Historical Marker #51 in Bourbon County highlights the history of the Cane Ridge Meeting House, the famous revival of 1801, and its results. Cane Ridge Meeting House, built in 1791, is a special place for many reasons. Hardy pioneers, following…

Historical Marker #2295 in Bourbon County explains the history of bourbon whiskey and Jacob Spears, one of the first distillers in the county. Early settlers first came into central Kentucky in the 1770’s. One thing they often did after staking…

Historical Marker #1246 in Paris commemorates Bourbon County's origins and its courthouses. There are no surviving images of the first courthouse located on this spot, but the Bourbon County court required a frame building with a shingled roof and…

Historical Marker #2104 in Louisville notes the historical significance of that city's Main Street whiskey firms. Louisville's rise to become Kentucky's largest city in the nineteenth century was due in large part to its location on the Ohio…

Historical Marker #2313 notes the legacy and location of Lexington's Historic Distillery District. Shortly after the end of the Civil War, the Headley and Farra Company established a distillery in Lexington on Old Frankfort Pike, now called…

Historical Marker #103 in Franklin County notes the location of Leestown, an early pioneer Kentucky River village just north of Frankfort. This site eventually became the location of a distillery complex. Two early Kentucky surveyors, brothers…

Historical markers #1986 and #1987 note the location and significance of the Labrot and Graham Distillery in Versailles, Kentucky. The Labrot and Graham distillery holds the distinction of being one of the oldest working distilleries in Kentucky. …

Historical Marker #2206 notes the location of the H. E. Pogue Distillery, which operated for more than fifty years near Maysville. The Ohio River route into what became Kentucky was popular with settlers from Maryland, Pennsylvania, and northern…

Historical Marker #2091 in Stamping Ground (Scott County) notes the location of Buffalo Springs, which provided an important supply of water for local distilleries. Large herds of buffalo once wandered what became Kentucky. These large mammals…

Historical Marker #2105 notes the creation of the Brown-Forman Company in Louisville, Kentucky, and one of the company's founders, George Garvin Brown. Brown was born in Munfordville, Kentucky, on September 2, 1846. He moved to Louisville in…

Historical Marker #2295 in Paris notes the influence of bourbon whiskey on Kentucky's history. When one considers what Kentucky is known for, at least three things quickly come to mind: horses, basketball, and bourbon. Whiskey has been distilled…

Historical Marker #1246 in Paris notes the history of Bourbon County, which was created in 1785. At the time, Kentucky was part of Virginia. Bourbon County, which was carved from Fayette County, was the fifth county established in what would…

Historical Marker #2103 in Louisville notes the significance of the “Old Forester” brand, which was the first commercially bottled bourbon. It will likely never be known who produced the first bourbon distilled in Kentucky. The spirits'…

Historical Marker #1426 in Bell County notes the historical significance of Cumberland Ford. This important natural crossing point on the Cumberland River was used by Native Americans, early explorers, and pioneer settlers. The Cumberland River…

Historical Marker #1600 in the town of Flat Lick (Knox County) commemorates an important point of divergence, if traveling north, or convergence, if traveling south, of the three major frontier roads in this region: the Warrior's Path, Boone Trace,…

Historical Marker #1228 commemorates the oldest house still standing in Bell County. The house was constructed out of brick about 1800. Although the subject matter of the marker is later than the era of Daniel Boone's early exploration, this house…

Historical Marker #2045 in Bell County commemorates the exploits of Dr. Thomas Walker, who preceded Daniel Boone and other early explorers to this region. In 1750, Walker named the Cumberland River for Prince William, the Duke of Cumberland, son…

Historical Marker #53 in Laurel County commemorates the famous "fork in the road." Here in 1775, Daniel Boone and his party of trailblazers diverged from the more primitive hunting trail, known as Skagg's Trace, and continued on to mark Boone…

Historical Marker #927, located on Highway 229 in Laurel County just south of Levi Jackson State Park, commemorates the site of a tavern which once stood on the historic Wilderness Road. This marker also serves as an identifier of the Boone Trace…

Historical Marker #1520, located at Fort Boonesborough State Park in Madison County, commemorates the founding of this early Kentucky settlement and fort. Fort Boonesborough was the final terminus of the epic journey that Daniel Boone and his…

Historical Marker #77 in Madison County commemorates the site of a Native American attack on Daniel Boone's trailblazing party while they constructed Boone Trace in the spring of 1775. Boone and his men camped at this location on Taylor's Fork of…

Historical Marker #1579 in Madison County commemorates the final destination point of Daniel Boone and his party of trail cutters. These men had taken a long journey during the months of March and April 1775, creating Boone Trace, which was the…

Historical Marker #1577 in Madison County commemorates the home of early Kentucky settler Captain Nathaniel Hart. Hart, a Revolutionary War soldier, was a member of the Transylvania Land Company. As chief negotiator and a leading advocate for…

Historical marker #2217 at Cumberland Gap commemorates the exploits of famed explorers Lewis and Clark, who passed through the Cumberland Gap in 1806. This marker also serves as a reminder for Boone Trace, which traversed this section of the…

Historical Marker #1443 in Madison County commemorates "Daniel Boone’s Trace," the famous trail constructed by Daniel Boone and his party of pioneers in 1775. The Trace ran from Cumberland Gap to Fort Boonesborough. Daniel Boone was hired by…

Historical Marker #1105 in McCracken County marks the place where Kentucky politician Linn Boyd's home stood. Boyd, who moved to Paducah in 1852, built this brick home and called it Oaklands. Boyd was born in Nashville, Tennessee, on November 22,…

Historical Marker #1112 in Paducah marks the grave of Alben W. Barkley, who was vice president in President Harry S. Truman's administration. When giving a speech at a student convention in Virginia, Barkley famously stated, "I would rather be a…

Historic Marker #2241 in Henderson County notes the location of the home of famed nurse Mary W. Arvin. On April 21, 1879, Mary was born in Henderson, Kentucky, to William Meade and Beattie Towles Arvin. In 1904, she graduated from the School of…

Historic marker #878 in Henderson County marks the site of the home for three generations of the Kimmel family and notes their military achievements. Marius Manning Kimmel was born in October 1832, in Perry County, Missouri. He attended Princeton…

Historical marker #870 in Henderson County commemorates the life of author and lecturer Lucy Furman. Furman earned renown by writing about rural Kentucky. She was born in Henderson County on June 7, 1869. After her parents' death early in her…

Historical Marker #985 in Johnson County remembers noted historian William Elsey Connelley. Born on March 5, 1855, on a prong of the Middle Fork of Jennie's Creek, Connelley received his earliest training from his parents. Overcoming a…

Historical Marker #556 in Johnson County remembers a Civil War skirmish at Paintsville, which led to the subsequent engagement at Half Mountain in Magoffin County. On April 12, 1864, Union Colonel George W. Gallup arrived in Paintsville,…

Historical Marker #2322 in Bowling Green commemoratesLillian H. South was born in Warren County, Kentucky, in 1879. The daughter of a doctor, she was educated in public schools and graduated from Potter College (now Western Kentucky University)…

Historical Marker #2309 in Henderson County commemorates former Kentucky Governor Albert B. "Happy" Chandler. During two terms in the governor's office, Chandler oversaw improvements in schools, roads, health and welfare programs, and penal…

Historical Marker #2220 in Henderson County commemorates the famed explorers Lewis and Clark and their journey through Henderson County. Robert Frazer, who joined Lewis and Clark on their expedition, visited Henderson several times after the…

Historical Marker #1926 in Henderson County commemorates Fernwood Cemetery, the final resting place of several prominent Kentuckians. Lazarus Powell was born in Henderson County in 1812. Powell graduated from St. Joseph's College in Bardstown…

Historical Marker #1777 in Henderson County commemorates Augustus Owsley Stanley, a Kentucky governor and U.S. congressman who used his charisma and colorful oratorical skills to win elected office. Born in Shelbyville on May 21, 1867, to William…

Historical Marker #1523 in Henderson County remembers John James Audubon, who is best known for his paintings of nature, especially birds, and his publication, "Birds of America." Audubon traveled across the country in his attempt to study and…

Historical Marker #1392 in Henderson County marks the location where the first Kentucky customer received rural electricity from an electric cooperative. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the law creating the Rural Electrification…

Historical Marker #1206 commemorates the formation of Henderson County. Located in western Kentucky along the Ohio River, Henderson County was the thirty-eighth county to be formed. Henderson County was named for Colonel Richard Henderson, the…

Historical Marker #717 in Henderson County commemorates General Samuel Hopkins, a Revolutionary War veteran who helped establish Henderson County. Born in Albermarle County, Virginia, in 1753, Samuel was the son of Dr. Samuel Hopkins and Isabella…

Historical Marker #191 in Henderson County remembers Mary Towles Sasseen Wilson, a Henderson school teacher who is recognized as the first person to celebrate Mother's Day in 1887. Mary was born March 5, 1860, in Henderson, Kentucky. The oldest…

Historical Marker #2208 in Paducah commemorates Lewis and Clark's 1803 visit to the area that eventually became Paducah and McCracken County. The famous soldier and adventurer George Rogers Clark visited this part of the Ohio River Valley during…

Historical Marker #828 in Paducah notes the location of Fort Anderson, a Union earthen fortification named for native Kentuckian Robert Anderson, the "Hero of Fort Sumter." When Confederate forces invaded western Kentucky in early September 1861,…

Historical Marker #66 in Henderson commemorates the Transylvania Company. Formed by Richard Henderson, the Transylvania Company was created to settle the area around the Kentucky, Ohio, and Cumberland rivers. The Company is also credited for…

Historical Marker #1957 in Paducah commemorates the eighth day of August. African Americans in Paducah have traditionally observed this day in celebration of their ancestors' emancipation from slavery. Even before the guns fell silent at the end…

Historical Marker #1065 in Paducah remembers the importance of the waterfront to this river city where the Tennessee River flows into the Ohio River. River towns are often established due to natural geographical distinctions. For example, cities…

Historical Marker #2240 in Bowling Green honors Kentucky author and women's suffragist, Eliza (Lida) Calvert (Obenchain) Hall. As an author, Hall wrote primarily short stories, the most well known collection being "Aunt Jane of Kentucky." Published…

Historical Marker #2158 in Warren County remembers Shake Rag, an African American community founded in the 1800s. Shake Rag was added to the National Register of Historic Places in September 2000, becoming Bowling Green’s first National…

Historical Marker #1882 in Warren County remembers James Turner Morehead, the first native Kentuckian to serve as governor. Born in Bullitt County on May 24, 1797, Morehead was raised in Logan County. After attending local schools, Morehead…

Historical Marker #1831 in Warren County commemorates Duncan Hines. The man behind the legendary cake mix was also known for his series of guidebooks that helped travelers make dining, lodging, and vacation decisions. Hines was born on March 26,…

Historical Marker #1024 in Warren County discusses the occupation of Bowling Green by Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War. Although Kentucky officially adopted a position of neutrality at the beginning of the conflict, the policy…

Historical Marker #997 in Warren County commemorates the 1798 founding of Bowling Green by Robert Moore. The city of Bowling Green was founded after two brothers, George and Robert Moore, moved to the area from Virginia in 1796. The next year,…

Historical Marker #987 recognizes the formation of Warren County. The twenty-fourth county in order of formation, it is named for Major General Joseph Warren. Born near Boston on June 11, 1741, Warren entered Harvard at age fourteen. He studied…

Historical Marker #769 in Warren County marks the home of lawyer and Civil War captain Thomas Henry Hines. Hines was born in Butler County, Kentucky, on October 9, 1838. While Hines had little formal schooling, his education was acquired outside…

Historical Marker #538 in Warren County commemorates the Union capture of Bowling Green on February 14, 1862. On September 18, 1861, Confederate General Simon Bolivar Buckner and nearly five thousand troops marched on Bowling Green. Capturing…

Historical Marker #67 in Warren County discusses Bowling Green's role as the state capital of Kentucky's Provisional Confederate government. Few states were as bitterly divided as Kentucky during the Civil War. The commonwealth's unique position…

Historical Marker #1698 in McCracken County commemorates John T. Scopes, who made national headlines as the defendant in the famous Tennessee "Monkey Trial." Scopes was born in Paducah, Kentucky, on August 3, 1900. After moving to Illinois in…

Historical Marker #1134 in McCracken County celebrates the historic Illinois Central Railroad. Rail played a significant role in the growth and expansion of western Kentucky through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Paducah served as…

Historical Marker #1053 in McCracken County commemorates the devastating flood of 1937. This flood led to some 27,000 citizens to be evacuated and caused several million dollars' worth of damage. January 1937 opened with a two-week period of…

Historical Marker #1043 in McCracken County remembers Confederate General Lloyd Tilghman. Tilghman was born in Maryland on January 26, 1818. At age fifteen, he entered the United States Military Academy at West Point and graduated five years…

Historical Marker #1006 in McCracken County commemorates the Jackson Purchase. This land, which was secured in 1818, includes Kentucky's eight westernmost counties, including McCracken County. The purchase was primarily negotiated by two agents…

Historical Marker #680 commemorates Alben W. Barley and his beloved estate, Angles, in McCracken County. Barkley was born on November 24, 1877, in a Graves County log cabin to tenant farmers John Wilson and Electra Eliza Barkley. In 1892, Barkley…

Historical Marker #517 in McCracken County recalls Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest's raid on Paducah in March 1864. The journey to Paducah from western Tennessee began in the spring of 1864. Forrest was intent on reaching Kentucky to…

Historical Marker # 1632 in Johnson County remembers entrepreneur John Caldwell Calhoun Mayo as a "dreamer" and a "doer." Born in Pike County on September 16, 1864, the Mayo family moved to Paintsville in Johnson County when John was five years…

Historical Marker #1126 commemorates the town of Paintsville, the county seat of Johnson County. Located at the junction of the Big Sandy River and Paint Creek, the first Anglo visitors arrived in 1750, when Dr. Thomas Walker led an expedition…

Historical Marker #1125 in Johnson County commemorates the naming of the county after Richard Mentor Johnson, a lawyer, soldier, and U.S. Vice President. Johnson was born on October 17, 1781, at Beargrass, a frontier settlement in present-day…

Historical Marker #903 in Johnson County commemorates Dr. Thomas Walker and his first expedition through the Cumberland Gap into Kentucky. While on this expedition, Dr. Walker and his companions camped at present-day Paintsville in 1750. Thomas…

Historical Marker #736 in Johnson County commemorates Harman Station, the first permanent settlement in eastern Kentucky. Matthias Harman, a Pennsylvania-born Virginian, became acquainted with Kentucky's Big Sandy River valley in the mid 1700s.…

Historical Marker #735 in Johnson County commemorates Jenny (Jennie) Wiley and her daring escape from the Native Americans who held her captive for nearly a year. Virginia Sellards Wiley was born about 1760 in Pennsylvania. When Jennie was a…

Historical Marker #700 in Johnson County commemorates John Hunt Morgan's 1864 retreat through Paintsville to Virginia. This was during Morgan's last Kentucky raid during the Civil War. Morgan's command consisted of approximately 2,700 men. On…

Historical Marker #608 in Johnson County commemorates arrival of Union troops in Paintsville in January 1862. That month, those soldiers fought in the Battle of Middle Creek in Floyd County, which proved to be an important Union victory. In…

Historical Marker #571 in Johnson County commemorates Jennie's Creek, which is named for the famed frontier heroine Virginia Wiley. The creek was named for Wiley after she crossed the water to escape from Native Americans who had held her captive. …

Historical Marker #1854 in Kenton County remembers Frank Duvenek, a world renowned artist and teacher. Duveneck was born in Covington on October 9, 1848, to German parents Bernard and Katherine Decker. Frank's father died while Frank was an…

Historical Marker #1709 in Kenton County remembers William Goebel, a lawyer and politician who began his career in Covington. Goebel was born in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, on January 4, 1856. Within a decade, after his father returned from service in…

Historical Marker #1601 in Kenton County commemorates the Roebling Suspension Bridge, the first bridge to span the Ohio River. Opened to traffic on January 1, 1867, at the time the bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world. The cost of…

Historical Marker #1594 in Kenton County marks the home of Jesse and Hannah Grant, the parents of President Ulysses S. Grant. The Grant family lived there from 1859 to 1873. Jesse Root Grant married Hannah Simpson on June 24, 1821, in Clermont…

Historical Marker #1488 in Kenton County remembers noted historian Richard Henry Collins. Collins was born on May 4, 1824, in Maysville, Kentucky, to Lewis and Eleanor Collins. His father, a judge and journalist, had also authored the "most…

Historical Marker #1460 in Kenton County commemorates the Mother of God Catholic Church in Covington as being the "Cradle of the Arts." The church, which was the second Catholic church to be erected in Covington, was the mother-parish to several…

Historical Marker #1168 commemorates the namesake of Kenton County, General Simon Kenton, who was an explorer and pioneer of early Kentucky. Born in Virginia on April 3, 1755, Kenton received no formal schooling as a boy, causing him to remain…

Historical Marker #50 in Kenton County marks the boyhood home of Daniel Carter Beard, an early leader of the Boy Scouts of America. Although Beard was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 21, 1850, he soon moved to nearby Covington, Kentucky. After…

Historical Marker #1734 in Scott County makes note of Ward Hall. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, Ward Hall is a stately structure located one mile east of Georgetown. Colonel Robert Johnson, a member of the first Constitutional…

Historical Marker #1861 in Scott County remembers General Basil W. Duke, best known for his service to the Confederacy during the Civil War, but also his significant political and literary contributions to Kentucky following the conflict. Duke was…

Historical Marker #718 in Scott County marks Cardome, the home of Governor James F. Robinson, who led the commonwealth through one of the most difficult periods in its history. Robinson was a true Renaissance man who farmed, practiced law, and served…

Historical Marker #610 memorializes George W. Johnson, the first Confederate governor of Kentucky, at his home in Scott County. Born in 1811 in Scott County, Johnson practiced law in Georgetown after receiving his degree from Transylvania…

Historical marker #2397 in Glasgow (Barren County) acknowledges the significant achievements of education reformer Nettie B. C. Depp. Like Rosa Stonestreet before her, Depp was elected superintendent of Barren County schools prior to the passage…

Historical marker #2221 in Louisville recognizes the contributions of Rebecca Rosenthal Judah, who was a leader of the National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW), and vice president and treasurer of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association (KERA). Judah…

Historical Marker #2197 in Lexington commemorates the Sayre Female Institute which is now the Sayre School. The school was founded in 1854 by David Austin Sayre for the education of young women. Sayre believed that women deserved an "education of…

Historical Marker #2196 in Louisville recognizes the achievements of pioneer educator Rosa Anna (Phillips) Stonestreet. Stonestreet was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, on February 18, 1859. She died in Louisville on April 7, 1936, and is…

Historical marker #2173 in Louisville acknowledges the contributions of the First Unitarian Church toward the civil rights and women's suffrage movements. The First Unitarian Church hosted Susan B. Anthony and Carrie Chapman Catt in January of 1895,…

Historical marker #2171 in Munfordville (Hart County) commemorates the life and service of Thelma Loyace (Hawkins) Stovall, Kentucky's first female lieutenant governor. Stovall was born on April 1, 1919, in Munfordville. Later moving to…

Historical Marker #2170 in Shelby County recognizes the political achievements of Thelma Stovall, who became the first woman to be elected lieutenant governor of Kentucky in 1975. Stovall was a female pioneer in southern politics. She began her…

Historical Marker #2136 in Catlettsburg (Boyd County) recognizes the historic achievement of Mary Elliott Flanery being the first woman elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1921. Flanery was active in the Kentucky Equal Rights…

Historical Marker #1876 in Lexington recognizes the contributions of Madeline McDowell Breckinridge to the women's suffrage movement. The marker is located on the grounds of Ashland, the estate of Henry Clay. Madeline Breckinridge was the…

Historical Marker #1872 in Richmond recognizes the work of Frances E. Beauchamp, an advocate for prohibition. Beauchamp was born in Madison County, Kentucky, and attended the Science Hill Academy for girls in Shelbyville. She married attorney James…

Historical Marker #1800 in Madison County recognizes the contributions of Laura Clay as a leader of women's suffrage in Kentucky. Clay was born near Richmond, Kentucky, on February 9, 1849, at White Hall, the estate of her father, Cassius…

Historical marker #1650 in Hardin County recognizes the political contributions of John Y. Brown, a former U.S. congressman and governor of Kentucky. Brown was born on June 28, 1835, in Elizabethtown, Kentucky. He graduated from Centre College…

Historical Marker # 2 in Fayette County remembers the 1825 visit the Marquis de Lafayette made to the estate of Major John Keen (the extra "e" was added later), who had served with the Frenchman in the Revolutionary War. Keeneland, however, has…

Historical Marker #1820 in Louisville notes the location of Woodlawn Race Course, sometimes referred to as the "Saratoga of the West." It was a track of major importance during the 1860s. Organized competitive horse racing in Kentucky was…

Historical Marker #1470 in Fayette County notes the many achievements of Wing Commander, a saddle horse who went undefeated in competition for seven years and won more than two hundred championships. When one thinks of Kentucky horses,…

Historical Marker #1475 in Jeffersontown notes the history of recognized jockey and horse trainer Roscoe Goose, who won the 1913 Kentucky Derby riding Donerail. Kentucky is known for producing the horses that win high-stakes races, but in racing's…

Historical Marker #2143 in Greenup County notes the location of Raceland, a horse racing track that was known as the "Million Dollar Oval." In 1922, plans were made to establish a horse racing track near Ashland, Kentucky. Property was purchased…

Historical Markers #1215 and #1635 in Lexington note the many accomplishments of Man-O-War, considered by many to be the greatest thoroughbred ever. In a state where horses have the tendency to become legends, no horse has drawn more historical…

Historical Marker #1992 in Louisville notes the location of the Louisville Cemetery, which was founded by prominent African American citizens in 1886. The Louisville Cemetery, near Germantown, holds the remains of many notable individuals from…

Historical Marker #2285 in Lexington notes the famous thoroughbred named for that Kentucky city. Kentucky has long been associated with horse racing in the United States, and the city of Lexington and the farms surrounding it have produced some of…

Historical Marker #1853 in Covington notes the historical significance of Latonia Race Track, which sponsored the Latonia Derby for many years. Horseracing, along with baseball, were two of America's favorite spectator sports in the last half of…

Historical Marker #6 in Lexington notes the location of the first straight quarter-mile horse racing course in Kentucky, which was established years before statehood. Kentucky was the first state settled west of the Appalachian Mountains. Many of…

Historical Marker #2336 in Louisville notes the location of Douglas Park Racetrack, which operated from 1895 to 1958. Horse racing flourished as a sport in late nineteenth-century America. Nowhere was that more apparent than in Kentucky. …

Historical Marker #166 in Fayette County notes the location of Coldstream Farm, which was originally part of Henry Price McGrath’s farm. McGrath was the owner of the famous race horse Aristides. Henry Price McGrath was born near Keene in…

Historical Markers #1885 and #2255 in Louisville note the location of Churchill Downs, the racetrack of the "Run for the Roses," the famous Kentucky Derby. Churchill Downs began when track founder Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr., the grandson of the…

Historical Marker #2040 in Louisville notes the location of Bashford Manor, a residence of J. B. Wilder, and, later, noted horse racing stable of George J. Long. Named for an ancestral home in Maryland, James Bennett Wilder had Bashford Manor…

Historical Marker #1295 in Harrodsburg notes the Mercer County origins of two Kentucky Derby winners: Leonatus in 1883 and George Smith in 1916. Leonatus, winner of the ninth Kentucky Derby (1883) was noted for his stamina and durability. He was…

Historical Marker #2321 in Louisville notes the historical significance of African American jockey Alonzo "Lonnie" Clayton, who won the Kentucky Derby in 1892 at age fifteen. Alonzo Clayton was born to Robert and Evaline Clayton in Kansas City,…

Historical Marker #565 in Jessamine County notes the location of Almahurst Farm, producer of Exterminator, a Kentucky Derby winner, and a number of great harness horses, including Greyhound. One of Almahurst Farm's claims to fame is that it foaled…

Historical Marker #1657 notes the location and significance of the Zion Baptist Church in Louisville. A small number of African Americans left the York Street Baptist Church to begin their own congregation in 1877. For a year they rented the old…

Historical Marker #1419 in Shelby County commemorates Whitney M. Young, Jr., one of the primary personalities of the Civil Rights Movement. Young was born in Lincoln Ridge, Kentucky (Shelby County), in 1921. His father was an educator, and later…

Historical Marker #2134 in Louisville notes Murray Atkins Walls’ achievements as an educator and civil rights activist. Walls was born on December 22, 1899, in Indianapolis. She was the daughter of a physician, Calvin R. Atkins. While in…

Historical Marker #2339 in Louisville notes the location of the house where the famous boxer and humanitarian Muhammad Ali grew up. Muhammad Ali, originally named Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr., was born in Louisville in 1942. Ali grew up at 3302…

Historical Marker #2036 in Owensboro notes the accomplishments of Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Moneta J. Sleet, Jr. An age-old adage declares that "a picture is worth a thousand words." But a picture also has the power to bring about…

Historical Marker #2147 in Millersburg (Bourbon County) notes the legislative service of Mae Street Kidd. Kidd was born during what many historians refer to as the "nadir of race relations" in the United States. She was born in Millersburg the…

Historical Marker #2019 in Glasgow honors Luska Joseph Twyman, the first African American elected to a full term as mayor of a Kentucky city. Twyman was born in Barren County in 1913. He was educated in the county's black public schools and…

Historical Marker #1930 in Shelby County notes the location of the Lincoln Institute, which was founded to educate African American students. In the wake of the Supreme Court Decision of the 1904 Kentucky Day Law, which legally segregated public…

Historical Marker # 1961 notes the importance of the Lexington Colored Fair Association, which highlighted the achievements of African Americans to society in the years following emancipation. Most often relegated to second class status by…

Historical Marker #1662 notes the Louisville location of the Knights of Pythias Temple. Although many fraternal organizations predated the Civil War, most African Americans were not allowed to form separate chapters of these benevolent societies…

Historical Marker #1998 in Louisville notes the pioneering civil rights efforts of I. Willis Cole, noted publisher of "The Louisville Leader," an African American newspaper. The great abolitionist Frederick Douglass once said, "Those who profess…

Historical Marker #2254 in Louisville notes the location of the home of Anne and Carl Braden, who were active in the Civil Rights Movement. Anne and Carl Braden are probably best known for their efforts to bring fair housing to Louisville in the…

Historical Marker #1663 in Louisville notes the achievements of African American educator and leader James Bond. Bond was born into slavery in 1863 on the Anderson County farm of Preston Bond. Preston Bond is listed in the 1860 census as a…

Historical Maker #2191 at Murray State University notes the 1955 desegregation of that educational institution. Much of the evidence that prompted the United States Supreme Court in the landmark "Brown v. the Board of Education" decision centered…

Historical Marker #2254 in Louisville notes the location of the Wade home, which was bombed in the summer of 1954 after an African American family attempted to live in an all-white neighborhood. By the early 1950s, Louisville had integrated much…

Historical Marker #1964 in Louisville notes the political career of Charles W. Anderson, Jr., the first African American elected to a Southern state legislature in the twentieth century. During the Reconstruction era, a number of African Americans…

Historical Marker #2008 notes contributions made to the University of Louisville by Charles H. Parrish, Jr., the institution's first African American professor. Parrish's father was born into slavery in Fayette County, Kentucky, in 1859. He…

Historical Marker # 2355 in Louisville notes the important role that non-violent demonstrations played in bringing an end to legal racial segregation in that city. In 1896, the United States Supreme Court ruled in the landmark case of "Plessy v.…

Historical Marker #1845 in Louisville notes the historical significance of Calvary Baptist Church to the city's African American community. Purchased for $1 and deeded to Henry Smith, a free man of color, in 1833, the plot of ground became a…

Marker #1970 in Anderson County notes the achievements of Anna Mac Clarke as a pioneer in military leadership and in ending segregation on military bases. Anna Mack Mitchel was born on June 20, 1919, in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. Her mother, Nora…

Historical Marker #1960 in Russellville notes the accomplishments of civil rights activist and author Alice Allison Dunnigan. A love of learning and a desire for self-improvement are important motivating factors in successful peoples' lives. …

Historical Marker #2406 commemorates Garden Hall, an elegant Georgian mansion located on Wapping Street in Frankfort. The home was built by Graham Vreeland, who was the founder, editor, and publisher of the "Frankfort State Journal." In October…

Historical marker #2394 in Boone County commemorates a daring prison escape made by Confederate cavalryman John Hunt Morgan. In November 1863, Morgan escaped from the Ohio State Penitentiary and crossed into Boone County, Kentucky. On July 31,…

Marker #2393 in Constance, Kentucky, commemorates the Anderson Ferry and the 1937 Flood in Boone County. On March 3, 1817, a ferry bond was issued to George Anderson to operate a ferry across the Ohio River. That year, Anderson bought the ferry…

Historical Marker #2387 in Harlan County commemorates the Pine Mountain Settlement School. William Creech, an early settler in the Pine Mountain valley, realized the need for a good school in the area. Creech had purchased seven hundred acres of…

Historical Marker #2385 in Louisville commemorates St. Frances of Rome Catholic Church, named for Francesca Romana who inspired women to pray, care for the sick, and feed the hungry. Frances was born in Rome to a noble family in 1384 and died in…

Historical Marker #2396 commemorates the Shelby Park Neighborhood, one of the areas in Louisville that was originally populated by German immigrants. This area of the city received one of the later waves of immigrants. In 1847, the upper third of…

Historical Marker #2383 in Marshall County commemorates Shelby McCallum, a businessman and public servant. Born in Jackson, Tennessee, on January 23, 1917, McCallum was raised in the nearby town of Humboldt. He graduated from Humboldt High School…

Historical Marker #2389 in Jefferson County commemorates the Naval Ordnance Plant and Naval Ordnance Station, called the "Gunsmiths to the Navy," which produced ordnance for the U.S. Navy during and after World War II. In 1940, the Department of…

Historical Marker #2384 commemorates the three Medal of Honor winners who were natives of Daviess County. John J. Given was born in Daviess County in 1840. He entered the U.S. Army in Cincinnati, Ohio, and fought in the Indian Campaigns…

Historical Marker #2390 in Campbell County commemorates Mary Boone Bryan, the wife of William Bryan and a sister of Daniel Boone. Mary was born in Pennsylvania and was the seventh child of Squire and Sarah M. Boone. She was about fourteen years…

Historical Marker #2391 in Boyle County commemorates the site of the Kirkland Home, which was one of the homes used by soldiers during the aftermath of the Battle of Perryville. Charles King Kirkland and Caroline Purdom Kirkland lived between the…

Historical Marker #2380 in Boone County commemorates the Crash of TWA Flight 694, which crashed two minutes after takeoff. Trans World Airlines Flight 694 departed Greater Cincinnati Airport en route to Cleveland, Ohio, at 9:02 a.m. on January 12,…

Historical Marker #2379 commemorates the life of Bishop John Monroe Moore, an important religious leader from Butler County. Moore was born on a farm near Morgantown on January 27, 1867. He began school at age seven and, at age seventeen,…

Historical Marker #2382 commemorates Bettie Taylor Phillips, one of Union County's most colorful citizens from the Civil War period. Bettie Taylor was born in Morganfield on April 6, 1830. In 1847, she married William S. Phillips of Uniontown.…

Historical Marker #2061 in Frankfort notes the location of barracks built by the federal government to house soldiers serving in Reconstruction era Kentucky. The immediate post-Civil War period in Kentucky has often been referred to by historians…

Historical Marker #1990 in Louisville notes the historical significance of the interstate slave trade to Kentucky’s economy before the Civil War. During the antebellum era, Kentucky, like the other border and upper-South states, served as an…

Historical Marker #2119 in Louisville notes the historical significance of York, William Clark’s slave, who was an active participant in the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Pacific Northwest. One of many sad realities of slavery is that…

Historical Marker #2249 in Nelson County notes the location of free man of color Ham Brown’s residence, which was formerly a slave quarters. Ham Brown appears in the historical record on several occasions. He and his wife, Adeline, are listed…

Historical Marker #606 in Elizabethtown notes the service of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and his men in Kentucky during the Reconstruction era. During the early 1870s, racial violence was so prevalent in Kentucky that the federal government…

Historical Marker #2094 in Jefferson County notes the location of Forest Home Cemetery, one of the oldest African American cemeteries in Kentucky. Forrest Home Cemetery would not exist were it not for one of the individuals buried there: Eliza…

Historical Marker #2027 in Woodford County notes the historical significance of Edward Dudley Brown, an African American jockey, horse owner, and trainer. Brown, better known as Brown Dick—nicknamed after a fast horse of that era —was born…

Historical Marker #124 in Mason County notes the birthplace of Charles Young, an early African American graduate of the United States Military Academy and the first black colonel in the U.S. Army. Young was born into slavery in 1864, just as the…

Historical Marker #2268 in Lincoln County notes the location of Boneyville, an "emancipation" or "free town" formed in the years immediately following the Civil War. Numerous small, rural, African American communities sprang up during the…

Historical Marker #2110 in Lexington notes the location of African American Cemetery #2, which was established in 1869. After the Civil War, Kentucky African Americans looked to make good on the social, political, and economic changes produced by…

Historical Marker #2048 marks the site of one of the 158 Rosenwald schools built in Kentucky between 1917 and 1932. This school, historically called "Lebanon School," was built in 1931 in Lebanon, Kentucky. It was used until 1961, when the Marion…

Historical Marker #670 commemorates Sandusky Station in Marion County, Kentucky. James Sodowsky (Sandusky) and his brother, Jacob, were members of Captain Isaac Hite's company of eleven adventurers who came to Kentucky in 1774. That May, they…

Historical Marker #1673 commemorates the town of Raywick in Marion County, Kentucky. The mass of early settlers to this area emigrated from Virginia and Maryland. Those who came from Virginia were mostly Presbyterians, while many of the Maryland…

Historical Marker #1509 commemorates the history of the grist mill and distillery that would later be known as Makers Mark in Loretto, Kentucky. In 1803, Charles Burks, his wife Sarah, and their family settled on the west bank of Hardin Creek in…

Historical marker #1667 commemorates the Old Calvary Cemetery in Marion County. Many of the area's early settlers are buried at this location. A large number of Kentucky's early settlers came from Virginia and Maryland. Many who came from…

Historical Marker #1302 commemorates Martin John Spalding, an early religious leader from Marion County, Kentucky. Spalding was born on May 23, 1810, in Rolling Fork, Kentucky, the sixth of eight children born to Richard and Henrietta Spalding. …

Historical Markers #206 and #207 commemorate the Loretto Sisters and the community of Loretto in Marion County. The Sisterhood of Loretto was established in Marion County in order to promote female piety and education. The Reverend Charles…

Historical Marker #1026 commemorates the history of St. Mary's College in St. Mary, Kentucky. Founded in 1821, St. Mary's College was the oldest extant Catholic college in Kentucky and was the third oldest Catholic college originally founded for boys…

Historical Marker #867 commemorates the history of the town of Lebanon and Marion County. Lebanon developed from a settlement that had formed around Hardin's Creek Meeting House, a Presbyterian congregation that was established by settlers from…

Historical Markers #728 and #1341, one in Lebanon and the other in Marion County, note the accomplishments of J. Proctor Knott, a U.S. congressman and governor of Kentucky. Knott was born in 1830 near Raywick in what would become Marion County. He…

Historical Marker #1303 in Lebanon notes the life and service of Bishop John Lancaster Spalding. Spalding was born in Lebanon in 1840 to Richard Martin and Mary Jane Lancaster Spalding. His uncle, John Martin Spalding, was the bishop of…

Historical marker #543 in Lebanon notes the death of General John Hunt Morgan's brother, Thomas, who was killed during an engagement there on July 5, 1863. Morgan's attempt at a great raid into Indiana and Ohio started, and ended, badly for the…

Historical Marker #585 in Lebanon notes the burning of the Marion County clerk's office by Morgan's Raiders on July 5, 1863. Marion County, Kentucky-s eighty-fourth county to be established, was created from Washington County in 1834. The…

Historical Marker #913 in Marion County notes the location of the first Catholic church west of the Allegheny Mountains. Kentucky’s earliest settlers came from the states of the mid-Atlantic region. While Virginia, Kentucky’s mother state,…

Historical Marker #1339 in Marion County notes the location of Cartwright’s Station, an important frontier post between the Cumberland Gap and the Falls of the Ohio River. Samuel Cartwright was an early explorer into what eventually became…

Historical Marker #600 notes a Civil War battle that occurred in Lebanon on July 5, 1863. During the Civil War, Lebanon’s location in central Kentucky proved to be a strategic point for both Union armies and Confederate raiders. The town was…

Historical Marker #2406 commemorates Garden Hall, an elegant Georgian mansion on Wapping Street in Frankfort. The home was built by Graham Vreeland, who was the founder, editor and publisher of the "Frankfort State Journal." In October 1908,…

Historical Marker #2293 is located at the Frankfort public library, which is named in honor of noted Kentucky artist Paul Sawyier. The building that initially housed the library was the former United States courthouse and post office. The current…

Historical marker #2204 in Frankfort identifies the boyhood home of Paul Sawyier, one of the most recognized and popular artists in Kentucky. Sawyier's popularity is due in large part to his work being so closely identifiable with particular…

Historical marker #1854 in Kenton County recognizes the artistic contribution of Frank Duveneck, whose home was in Covington, Kentucky. In addition to painting, Duveneck was on the faculty of the Cincinnati Art Academy. There, in 1891, noted…

Historical marker #1780 in Lexington is located at the boyhood home of Kentucky artist Thomas Satterwhite Noble. Noble was a faculty member at the Cincinnati Art School. Painter Paul Sawyier studied under him between 1884 and 1885. Sawyier's…

Historical Marker #1524 is located on the Old State Capitol grounds in Frankfort, where artist Paul Sawyier painted many landmarks. These included the town's old covered bridge, the fountain in front of the old post office and court house, and the…

Historical marker #1513 in Jessamine County commemorates the site of the Camp Nelson Covered Bridge, which was razed in 1933. Kentucky artist Paul Sawyier painted several scenes near Camp Nelson while he was living on his houseboat on the…

Historical Marker #1381 near Wilmore pays tribute to High Bridge, which spans the Kentucky River connecting Mercer and Jessamine counties. While living on a houseboat on the Kentucky River, Sawyier spent a good deal of time anchored at High Bridge. …

Historical Marker #1164 in Frankfort recognizes the former site of the Kentucky River Mills, which was the last hemp factory to operate in Kentucky (1878 -1952). Kentucky artist Paul Sawyier briefly worked as a salesman for the mill, beginning in…

Historical Marker #675 in Jessamine County commemorates Kentucky artist Paul Sawyier, who was nicknamed "The River Artist." Sawyier lived in a houseboat on the Kentucky River from the fall of 1908 until 1913. The houseboat served as both his…

Historical Marker #113 commemorates the gravesite of Daniel Boone, who was reinterred in the Frankfort Cemetery in 1845. Kentucky artist Paul Sawyier often worked in the Frankfort Cemetery where one of his subjects was the memorial monument to…

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Historical Marker #1188 in Letcher County notes the location of the Scuttle Hole Gap Road, a thoroughfare used by the mountain community since the early nineteenth century. During Kentucky’s early history, travel through the Appalachian…

Historical Marker #2314 in Letcher County notes the tragic mine explosions that occurred at Scotia Mine in 1976. The accidents are noted as being one of the worst mine disasters in U.S. history. When industrial coal mining came to the mountains of…

Historical Marker #510 in Letcher County notes the history of Pound Gap, a natural pass in the Appalachian/Pine Mountain range. Early explorers moving west looked for natural passes through the rugged Appalachian Mountains. Many of these passes…

Historical Marker #1197 in Letcher County notes the history of early Kentucky settler and Revolutionary War soldier James Caudill. Caudill (early spelling Cordill) was born in 1753 in Lunenburg County, Virginia. As a young man during the…

Historical Marker #1732 in Whitesburg notes the Cold War U-2 spy incident involving Letcher County native Francis Gary Powers. Powers was born in Jenkins, Kentucky, on August 17, 1929. He graduated from Milligan College in Tennessee in 1950. …

Historical Marker #1906 near Jenkins, Kentucky, notes the heroism of Lt. Darwin K. Kyle, who won the Medal of Honor in the Korean War. Darwin Keith Kyle was born in the coal mining town of Jenkins, Kentucky, on June 1, 1918. Kyle entered the U.S.…

Historical Marker #1804 in Jenkins notes the history of this Letcher County coal town. In the last decade of the 19th century coal production by industrial companies began in earnest. A rapidly industrializing United States needed a fuel source…

Historical Marker #1294 in Letcher County notes the location of Kingdom Come, the valley immortalized in novelist John Fox, Jr.’s "The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come." By the time John Fox, Jr., made the valley of Kingdom Come famous with the…

Historical Marker #777 in Letcher County notes how that region influenced the accomplished novelist John Fox, Jr. Born during the Civil War in Bourbon County, Kentucky, Fox was educated in local schools, at Transylvania University, and at Harvard,…

Historical Marker #1700 in Letcher County notes where one of the region’s first pioneers, Archelous Craft, initially settled. Although the southeastern part of Kentucky saw the earliest exploration in the years before and immediately after…

Historical Marker #809 in Letcher County notes the namesake of the county, Governor Robert Perkins Letcher. Letcher was born in Goochland County, Virginia, in 1788. His family moved to Garrard County, Kentucky, about twelve years later. As a…

Historical marker #2204 in Frankfort identifies the boyhood home of Paul Sawyier, one of the most recognized and popular artists in Kentucky. Sawyier's popularity is due in large part to his work being so closely identifiable with particular…

Historical Marker #1372 in Frankfort notes the Revolutionary War service of the state's early governors. Although only one formal engagement occurred in what would become Kentucky (the Battle of Blue Licks, August 19, 1782), the Revolutionary War…

Historical Marker #1208 in Frankfort notes the location of the Old Governor's Mansion, the former residence of the state's chief executive. When Kentucky became the nation's fifteenth state in 1792, Frankfort was selected as the capital. The…

Historical Marker #1490 in Frankfort notes the location of the State Arsenal building, which now serves as the Kentucky Military History Museum. In 1836, a devastating fire and explosion that heavily damaged the state arsenal necessitated the…

Historical Marker #1524 in Frankfort notes the location of the Old State Capitol, which served as the state’s center of government from 1830 to 1910. Due to the generous donation of land and building materials by the town's citizens, Frankfort…

Historical Marker #1955 commemorates Frankfort's Union Station and an early railroad tunnel built near downtown. In 1820, Lexington was still the largest town in the commonwealth. The coming of the steamboat, followed by an economic depression in…

Historical Marker #1420 in Frankfort honors Walter Allerton Wentworth, who was known as the father of the Kentucky Historical Highway Marker Program. A native of New Hampshire, Wentworth was a graduate of Iowa State University and received his…

Historical Marker #806 in Adair County notes the location of the home of Colonel William Casey, the namesake of Casey County. Casey was one of the first explorers and settlers to venture into the Green River region of Kentucky. Born in 1754, he…

Historical Marker #522 commemorates the Confederate occupation of Frankfort in September 1862. That summer, multiple Confederate armies invaded Kentucky in order to pull Union troops away from the vital railroad junction of Chattanooga, Tennessee.…

Historical Marker #2242 in Columbia notes the location of the Male and Female School, a subscription school that served the community for several decades. In 1853, Columbia recognized a need for better educational opportunities for local children.…

Historical Marker #1813 in Adair County notes the location of the home of novelist Janice H. Giles. Giles was born in 1905 in Altus, Arkansas. Her parents, John and Lucy Holt, were teachers on Native American reservations in Arkansas and…

Historical Marker #128 in Columbia notes the location of the girlhood home of Jane Lampton Clemens, the mother of Samuel Clemens, popularly known as the writer Mark Twain. Jane Lampton was born in Adair County in 1803 to Benjamin and Margaret…

Historical Marker #1782 in Columbia notes the service of pioneer Daniel Trabue. When one thinks of Kentucky’s early explorers, names like Daniel Boone, Simon Kenton, and William Clark immediately come to mind. These pioneers, however, were not…

Historical Marker #707 in Columbia notes Confederate cavalryman John Hunt Morgan’s visits to the area when his rebel horsemen raided Kentucky during the Civil War. Morgan’s raids into his native Kentucky brought him though the same towns…

Historical Marker #2243 in Columbia notes the location and significance of the Columbia-Union Presbyterian Church. One of the area's earliest setters was Colonel William Casey. About 1803, Casey generously donated land for a log church, named…

Historical Marker #1599 in Columbia notes the location of the historic Adair County courthouse. Town life in Kentucky’s small communities used to be centered on the local courthouse square. People attended "court days" to conduct business, buy…

Historical Marker #1412 in Louisville notes the location of the Zachary Taylor National Cemetery. By the time Zachary Taylor fought in the Mexican-American War, he was already an accomplished soldier in the U.S. Army. During the Second Seminole…

Historical Marker #1849 in Louisville notes the location of the boyhood home of general and president Zachary Taylor. U.S. President Zachary Taylor was born in Orange County, Virginia, in 1784 to Richard and Sarah Dabney Taylor. The Taylor family…

Historical Marker #925 in Owen County notes the location of the town of Monterey, which was established in 1847 and named for a Mexican-American War battle that had been fought the previous year. Fought from September 19-25, 1846, the Battle of…

Historical Marker #964 in Paducah highlights the service of Kentucky’s soldiers during the Mexican-American War. When war broke out with Mexico in 1846, Kentuckians enthusiastically responded to the call for troops. In an address to the…

Historical Marker #1589 in Louisville notes the military service of the Louisville Legion. Kentuckians responded enthusiastically to the call for volunteers to fight in the Mexican-American War. One of the first units to offer their services was…

Historical Marker #79 in Richmond, Kentucky, notes the birthplace of famed western scout and soldier Christopher "Kit" Carson. Carson was born in Madison County, Kentucky, near Richmond, in 1809. His father, a Revolutionary War veteran, moved…

Historical Marker #1809 in Lexington notes the military career of Gen. John Hunt Morgan. Years before Morgan became known as the "Thunderbolt of the Confederacy," he gained valuable military experience during the Mexican-American War. Morgan…

Historical Marker #634 in Carroll County notes the residence of Mexican-American War hero and 1848 vice presidential candidate, William Orlando Butler. William O. Butler was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky, in 1791. He attended Transylvania…

Historical Marker #1010 in Boyd County notes the location of the Buena Vista Furnace. Established in 1847, it was named for the Mexican-American War battle fought that same year. U.S. and Mexican forces clashed at Buena Vista on February 22-23,…

Historical Marker #1 in Lexington notes the location of Ashland, the home and estate of Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. Clay and his wife, Lucretia, were blessed with eleven children. One of these, Henry Clay, Jr., was killed in the…

Historical Marker #877 in Mason County, Kentucky, notes the birthplace of Mexican-American War hero Alexander William Doniphan. Born in Mason County on July 9, 1808, Doniphan came from a long line of soldiers, including both of his grandfathers,…

Located in Prestonsburg, Kentucky, Historical Marker #2018 commemorates the Samuel May House. Built in 1817, the house was the hub of a 350-acre farm that served as a recruiting and supply post for the Confederate Army during the Civil War. The…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the Class of 2012, Historical Marker #2392 commemorates the Class Competitions and Tug of War that were held annually on UK's campus. In the 1900s, these competitions between the freshman and sophomore classes…

Historical marker #2185 commemorates White Hall State Historic Site, located in Richmond, Kentucky. White Hall was the home of entrepreneur General Green Clay and emancipationist and politician, General Cassius Marcellus Clay. An astute…

Historical Marker #2086 commemorates Locust Grove, a National Historic Landmark and unique example of early Kentucky architecture, craftsmanship and history. The circa 1792 Georgian mansion, restored and furnished to its original appearance and…

Historical Marker #93 commemorates the Duncan Tavern Historic Center in Paris, Kentucky. In 1788, four years before Kentucky became a state, Major Joseph Duncan built his imposing inn on what is now the public square of Paris. Built of native…

Historical Marker #1653 interprets Liberty Hall, a house museum in Kentucky's capital. Located in downtown Frankfort on the banks of the Kentucky River, Liberty Hall Historic Site was the home of the Brown family, one of Kentucky's most important…

Historical Marker #2373 commemorates the Brennan House in Louisville. Located at 631 South 5th Street, the Brennan House is the only historic home remaining on a street once lined with similarly grand homes - an oasis of Victorian refinement amid…

Historical Marker #2141 commemorates Riverside, the Farnsley-Moremen Landing in Jefferson County. Standing on a rise overlooking the Ohio River, the Farnsley-Moremen House is the centerpiece of this nearly 300-acre historic site known today as…

Historical Marker #2388 in Danville notes the community's African American contributions to the Union army during the Civil War. In many instances, slaves and free men of color who tried to join the Union army faced substantial danger. The…

Historical Marker #2226 in Frankfort commemorates the only monument in the state that honors the nearly 25,000 African American Kentuckians who served in the United States Colored Troops during the American Civil War. Although Kentucky remained…

Historical Marker #1481 in Mercer County recognizes the Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill. The Society of Believers, more commonly known as the Shakers, immigrated to America from England in 1774 to avoid religious persecution. By the early…

Historical Marker #215 in Vanceburg notes the Union monument placed there in 1884 by the citizens of Lewis County. Kentucky, like the United States, was divided during the Civil War. Although the commonwealth sent more than two-thirds of its…

Historical Marker #57 in Todd County marks the birthplace of Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis. Both Davis and his Union counterpart, President Abraham Lincoln, were born in Kentucky. Born on June 3, 1808, near the Fairview community of…

Historical Marker #147 in Calloway County commemorates Fort Heiman, a Confederate fort erected in 1861. Fort Heiman is the least well known of three Confederate forts that were built to guard the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers. Constructed in…

Historical Marker #68 in Maysville commemorates the founding of that Mason County city. Originally called Limestone and located on the Ohio River, Maysville, like Cumberland Gap in the Appalachian Mountains, was a natural avenue for the earliest…

Historical Marker #1347 commemorates Freetown Church, which is located near Gamaliel, Kentucky, in Monroe County. The church was built in the late 1840s by three former slaves who had been freed by their owner, William Howard. Howard had migrated…

Historical Marker #1102 in Bardstown notes the location of Federal Hill, better known as "My Old Kentucky Home." This Kentucky landmark was the estate of Judge John Rowan and reputedly served as the inspiration for Stephen Foster's minstrel song…

Historical Marker #2107 in Lyon County commemorates Andrew Jackson Smith, an African American soldier who won the Medal of Honor for heroism in the Civil War. Smith, the son of an enslaved African American and her white owner, was born in Lyon…

Historical Marker #1241 in Daviess County notes the location of the Riley family home place. The Rileys were the owners of Josiah Henson, a slave whom Harriet Beecher Stowe used to help model her main character in the famous novel "Uncle Tom's…

Historical Marker #2375 in Scott County notes the location of Stonetown, one of a number of Kentucky African American rural communities that formed in the years following the Civil War. When the Civil War ended, many of Kentucky’s freed slaves…

Historical Marker #1989 in Jefferson County notes the legal history of slavery in Kentucky. Slavery was a part of Kentucky long before statehood was granted in 1792. The state's earliest settlers brought their human property with them from their…

Historical Marker #1863 in Kenton County notes the escape of enslaved woman Margaret Garner, who murdered her daughter to prevent the child’s return to slavery. In the winter of 1856, Boone County slave owner Archibald Gaines learned how…

Historical Marker # 1099 in Trimble County notes the work of abolitionist Delia Webster. Born in Vermont and educated at Oberlin College in Ohio, Delia Webster was tried, convicted, and jailed in Kentucky for helping slaves run away from Lexington…

Historical Marker #533 in Madison County notes the life of Kentucky emancipationist Cassius Marcellus Clay. During his long life, Clay participated in many battles. Some were fought to ensure free speech for antislavery advocates. Others,…

Historical Marker #2072 in Louisville notes the escape of two slaves, Thornton and Lucie Blackburn, who made their way to Canada. In 1831, newlywed slaves Thornton and Lucie Blackburn learned that Lucie was about to be sold to the Deep South slave…

Historical Marker #2076 in Bracken County commemorates abolitionist John Gregg Fee. Born in 1816, Fee was the son of a Bracken County slaveholder. Educated at Augusta Academy, Miami University, and Lane Seminary in nearby Cincinnati, Fee began…

Historical Marker #844 in Greensburg notes the home of the Reverend David Rice, an early emancipationist in Kentucky. In 1792, Kentucky entered the Union as the fifteenth state. As a former county of Virginia, the Bluegrass State inherited many…

Historical Marker #773 in Madison County notes the location of Berea College, a school founded in 1855 by abolitionist John G. Fee. In 1853, Kentucky emancipationist Cassius Marcellus Clay invited minister and abolitionist John G. Fee to Madison…

Historical Marker #2259 in Barren County notes the location of Diamond Cavern, which was discovered by a slave in 1859. When most people envision slavery, they think of agricultural workers toiling away in fields on farms and plantations. For…

Historical Marker #2122 in Lexington notes the location of the Cheapside slave auction block. During the antebellum years, Lexington was the capital of Kentucky's slave trade. Because of the city's location in the heart of the bluegrass region,…

Historical Marker # 1965 in Jessamine County notes the location of the Camp Nelson refugee camp, which housed the families of hundreds of African American soldiers. Camp Nelson was established in 1863 as a recruiting station and quartermaster…

Historical Marker #36 in Danville, Kentucky, notes the birthplace of abolitionist and nineteenth-century presidential candidate, James Gillespie Birney. Birney was born in Danville in 1792 to a slaveholding family. As a young man he was educated…

Historical Marker #1 in Lexington notes the location of "Ashland," the home and estate of Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. Ashland was Clay’s pride and joy. At this grand estate the "Great Compromiser" entertained guests, raised prize-winning…

Historical Marker #2361 in McCracken County notes the Civil War service of the 8th United States Colored Heavy Artillery. During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln believed that Kentucky-a loyal, slaveholding border state-was critical to the…

Historical Marker #2386 notes the location of the Willis Russell House in Danville. Russell, a free man of color who lived in the house, taught African American children during the mid-nineteenth century. During the antebellum years, many slave…

Historical Marker #780 marks the birthplace of Champ Ferguson, a Civil War guerrilla who was hanged by Union authorities after the Civil War. Ferguson was born in Clinton County, Kentucky, in 1821. By the time the Civil War erupted, he had…

Historical Marker #1127 in Bowling Green commemorates Riverview at Hobson Grove, which was occupied by Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Built on high ground overlooking the Barren River, Riverview at Hobson Grove was the home of wealthy…

Historical Marker #521 in Bell County notes the importance of the Cumberland Gap during the American Civil War. Cumberland Gap is located on the route of the famous old "Wilderness Road," one of the entry points into Kentucky during the pioneer…

Historical Marker #1413 in Bullitt County commemorates Confederate General John Hunt Morgan's raid into Ohio. Morgan's "Great Raid" in the summer of 1863 lasted more than forty-five days and covered nearly one thousand miles. The raid met with…

Historical Marker #637 in Carter County notes the route of retreat north from Cumberland Gap made by Union General George W. Morgan's Union force during the fall of 1862. That September, Confederate troops led by General Carter L. Stevenson neared…

Historical Marker 1324 in Bullitt County notes that General William T. Sherman brought a Union force to Lebanon Junction in September 1861 to counter the Confederate capture of Bowling Green. The end of Kentucky's neutrally in September 1861…

Historical Marker #1826 , which was erected in front of Memorial Coliseum in 1988, before the Senior Challenge Historical Marker Project began, honors Adolph Frederick Rupp. He was born to Mennonite German parents in Halstead, Kansas, in 1901 and was…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2011, Historical Marker #2381 honors Aristides, the winner of the first Kentucky Derby. In May 1875, an estimated 10,000 racing fans watched the first running of the Kentucky Derby in Louisville.…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2010, Historical Marker #2342 honors Thomas Hunt Morgan. Born in Lexington on September 25, 1866, he was the eldest child of Charlton Hunt Morgan and a nephew of Confederate cavalryman John Hunt…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2009, Historical Marker #2315 commemorates the Margaret I. King Library. Margaret Isadora King was born in Lexington on September 1, 1879. She graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1898 and…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2008, historical marker #2289 commemorates how the University of Kentucky got its name. In 1865, the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky (A&M) was established as part of the private…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2007, Historical Marker #2262 commemorates Stoll Field. The field was the site of the first intercollegiate game ever played south of the Mason-Dixon Line on April 9, 1880. Kentucky University (now…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2006, Historical Marker #2232 honors historian Thomas D. Clark. Born on July 14, 1903, in Louisville, Mississippi, he graduated from the University of Mississippi with an A. B. in 1928. He went on…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2005, historical marker #2169 commemorates the "Kentucky Kernel." Preceded by several earlier student newspapers, the first Kentucky Kernel was published on September 16, 1915. By 1923, it had…

Given to the university by the class of 2004, Historical Marker #2138 commemorates the Main Building. It opened in 1882 and was known as the Main or College Building. It is the only surviving building out of four original structures located here when…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2003, Historical Marker #2106 commemorates Patterson Hall. When women finally obtained campus housing in 1904, twenty-four years after the first woman enrolled at UK, this hall was opened. It was…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2002, Historical Marker #2089 commemorates Memorial Hall. Completed in 1929 as a memorial to Kentuckians who died in World War I, the building was financed by statewide contributions. The interior…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2001, Historical Marker #2070 commemorates Barker Hall and Buell Armory. Originally known as Alumni Hall, it was dedicated in 1901. The original building was three stories with a gymnasium and a…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2000, Historical Marker #2069 commemorates Maxwell Place. It was built in 1870-72 for Judge James H. Mulligan as a wedding gift from his father, Dennis Mulligan, who was an active and influential…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 1999, Historical Marker #2022 commemorates the desegregation of UK. In 1948, Lyman T. Johnson filed suit for admission to the university. In March 1949, Federal Judge H. Church Ford ruled in…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 1998, Historical Marker #2009 commemorates Scovell Hall. The building was opened in 1905, with major additions in 1913 and 1937. Utilizing colonial architecture, it was the largest building on the…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 1997, Historical Marker #2011 honors Sarah Blanding (1898-1985). She was born on a farm in Kentucky in 1898. After graduating from the New Haven Normal School of Gymnastics in 1919, she was hired as…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 1996, Historical Marker #2012 commemorates the Gillis Building. This building was erected in 1889 as UK's first Agricultural Experiment Station but was destroyed in a fire in 1891. The current…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 1995, Historical Marker #1966 commemorates radio stations WBKY and WUKY. UK began radio broadcasting in 1929 in cooperation with WHAS in Louisville. Each weekday, live music and educational…

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 1994, Historical Marker #1953 commemorates Miller Hall. Built in 1898 and originally named Science Hall, it was one of the first classroom buildings on the campus. For many years it housed the…

Historical Marker #1681 interprets Louisville's steamboat era, highlighting the role that river navigation played in the city's history. Many notable visitors arrived at the Louisville wharf at 4th Street, including Abraham Lincoln, who visited…

Historical Marker #858 in Hardin County identifies the path that Abraham Lincoln's family traveled during their migration to Indiana. In 1816, the Lincoln family moved from present-day Larue County, Kentucky, to southern Indiana. Abraham Lincoln…

Historical Marker #1038 in Washington County identifies the location of the home of Jesse Head, who performed the marriage of Abraham Lincoln's parents. The Reverend Jesse Head was born in 1768 in Frederick County, Maryland, migrating to Kentucky…

Historical Marker #12 in Fayette County identifies the birthplace of Mary Todd Lincoln, wife of the sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln. Mary Ann Todd was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on December 13, 1818. She was the granddaughter of Levi…

Historical Marker #719 interprets the life of William Mentor Graham. Graham was born around 1800 and reared in Green County, Kentucky. He received his education in Hardin County, Kentucky, prior to moving to Sangamon County, Illinois, in 1826.…

Historical Marker #833 in Hardin County interprets the Helm Cemetery, resting place of Kentucky Governor John LaRue Helm and Confederate General Benjamin Hardin Helm. Benjamin Helm was a brother-in-law of Abraham Lincoln, having married Emilie…

Historical Marker #827 in Larue County recognizes Austin Gollaher, childhood friend of Abraham Lincoln. Gollaher is best known as the man who claimed to have saved Lincoln's life. Gollaher was born in 1805, died in 1898, and is buried in the…

Historical Marker #73 in Breckinridge County recognizes the path that Abraham Lincoln's family took when leaving Kentucky in 1816. Abraham Lincoln recounted the reason for this move as "partly on account of slavery; but chiefly on account of the…

Historical Marker #2297 in Washington County recognizes Lincoln Homestead State Park. The Lincoln family moved to this site after the death of Lincoln's grandfather-also named Abraham Lincoln-in 1789. His widow, Bersheba, and her five children,…

Historical Marker #2261 in Fayette County recognizes the Mary Todd Lincoln House, which is now a museum. Mary Ann Todd was born in Lexington, Kentucky, on December 13, 1818. She was the granddaughter of Levi Todd, one of the founders of Lexington,…

Historical Marker #846 recognizes Greensburg as the birthplace of William Henry Herndon, who was Abraham Lincoln's law partner for sixteen years. Herndon was born in Greensburg, Kentucky, in 1818. His family moved to Illinois in 1820 and settled…

Historical Marker #1329 in Union County identifies the location of Abraham Lincoln's 1840 speech on behalf of Whig presidential candidate William Henry Harrison. It is the only known speech that Lincoln gave in Kentucky. Although the Whig Party…

Historical Marker #49 at Constitution Square in Danville commemorates the site of Kentucky's earliest district court sessions. Before 1792, Kentucky was part of Virginia. Therefore, ten years before statehood, Virginia law created the Kentucky…

Historical Marker #2297 recognizes Abraham Lincoln's boyhood home near Knob Creek. Lincoln's earliest memories centered around the Knob Creek Farm. The Lincoln family, Thomas and Nancy and their son Abraham and daughter Sarah, moved to Knob Creek…

Historical Marker #526, located in Springfield, Kentucky, references the marriage of Abraham Lincoln's parents in Washington County in 1806. The original marriage bond between Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks is housed at this site in the…

Historical Marker #667 in Hancock County designates the location of Abraham Lincoln's first law case in which he successfully defended himself against charges of operating a ferry without a license. In the fall and winter of 1826-27, Lincoln…

Historical Marker #2231 in Louisville denotes Farmington Historic Plantation, a fourteen-room Federal-style home built by John and Lucy Speed in 1816. The house was designed from plans drawn by Thomas Jefferson. For much of its existence,…

Historical Marker #2235 identifies the home of Henry Clay, one of the most influential U.S. politicians of the nineteenth century. After Clay's death in 1852, his heirs sold Ashland land to his son, James Brown Clay, who built the current house…

Historical Marker #197 in Danville commemorates the founding of the Kentucky School for the Deaf (KSD), "the first state-supported school in the United States for the instruction of deaf children." In the early nineteenth century, General Elias…

Historical Marker #2284 in downtown Danville commemorates the Ephraim McDowell House. There, in 1809, Danville physican Ephraim McDowell performed the world's first successful abdominal operation when he removed a twenty-two pound ovarian tumor from…

Historical Marker #1958 in Danville commemorates an African American business district that stood near present-day Constitution Square for more than 100 years. After the Civil War, African American Kentuckians gravitated to rural hamlets, towns,…

Historical Marker #755 commemorates Grayson's Tavern, a popular meeting spot in Danville constructed by Benjamin Grayson in 1785. Used by local residents and travelers, Grayson's Tavern was an important part of Kentucky's early political…

Historical Marker #2216 in Danville commemorates the visit from Lewis and Clark. Being on a major highway has its advantages. It is true today and was true more than two hundred years ago. Danville's location on the famed Wilderness Road brought…

Historical marker #190 in Danville commemorates the town's namesake, Walker Daniel. One who knew Daniel called him "a young gentleman of rare talents," and one who "gave promise of great distinction." Sadly, Daniel was killed in 1784, a casualty of…

Marker #1482 identifies the approximate site of Abraham Lincoln's first school, which was located 2-3 miles from the family's Knob Creek farm. His first teacher was Zacharia Riney. Lincoln attended these ABC, or "blab" schools with his older…

Marker #101 identifies the site where Abraham Lincoln, Sr., grandfather of the sixteenth president, was killed by Indians in 1786. In referring to his grandfather in a letter to Jesse Lincoln in 1854, Lincoln wrote that "the story of his death by…

Historical Marker #2281 commemorates the life and legacy of Ephraim McDowell, the "father of abdominal surgery." A native of Rockbridge County, Virginia, Ephraim McDowell moved to Danville, Kentucky, when he was a child. His father, Samuel…

Historical Marker #1279 in Danville notes the first recorded hemp crop in Kentucky, which was grown on Clark's Run Creek in 1775. Hemp has a long history in Kentucky. From its first recorded planting near Danville to its reemergence during World…

Historical Marker #1606, located at the Boyle County Courthouse in Danville, commemorates John Marshall Harlan, a Boyle County native, Civil War veteran, and U.S. Supreme Court justice. Born a few miles west of Danville in 1833, Harlan's family…

Historical Marker #1442 notes that Trinity Episcopal Church is "one of the oldest church buildings in Danville." Constructed in 1830 by resident Robert Russel Jr., the early members of the church included Dr. Ephraim McDowell, who performed the…

Historical Marker #24 commemorates Danville native Theodore O'Hara, a Civil War veteran and poet who wrote the famous poem "The Bivouac of the Dead." Today, O'Hara's poem is inscribed on monuments across the nation, including the gates of Arlington…

Historical Marker #2005 in Danville commemorates Jacobs Hall, a structure at the Kentucky School for the Deaf (KSD). The marker also recognizes the namesake of the building, John A. Jacobs, who was "KSD's first trained teacher, principal, [and]…

Historical Marker #754 commemorates the Danville Presbyterian Church, which was used as a hospital following the Battle of Perryville. When the Reverend David Rice traveled through pioneer Kentucky, he saw a need for churches. "I found scarcely…

Historical marker #756, located at the Boyle County Courthouse in Danville, commemorates the occupation of the structure as a field hospital during the Civil War. When the Battle of Perryville was fought ten miles from Danville on October 8,…

Historical Marker #923 in Danville commemorates Centre College, an institution of higher learning that the Washington Post has called "one of the premier intellectual gathering points in its region." Founded in 1819 by former governor Isaac…

The summer before Abraham Lincoln was elected president, he wrote a response to Samuel Haycraft, who had asked Lincoln to return to Kentucky to visit his boyhood home. Although few Kentuckians supported Lincoln's bid for the presidency, the future…

Historical Marker #2312 commemorates two battles that John Hunt Morgan fought in Cynthiana during the Civil War. In the summer of 1862, Confederate raider John Hunt Morgan launched his first major raid into Kentucky. The famed "Thunderbolt of the…

Historical Marker #1919 commemorates the Battle of Camp Wildcat, which was fought near London, Kentucky, in October 1861. During the early stages of the Civil War, both sides actively recruited Kentucky's men of military age. Of particular…

Historical Marker #706 in Taylor County notes the Battle of Tebbs Bend. There, on July 4, 1863, Confederate raider John Hunt Morgan's command ran into a much smaller Federal force on the Green River and was soundly defeated. This engagement set an…

Historical Marker #1917 in Kenton County commemorates Fort Wright, a defensive position that was named in honor of Union General Horatio G. Wright. In August and September 1862, Confederate generals Edmund Kirby Smith and Braxton Bragg invaded…

Historical Marker #1604 in Bardstown notes the home of Governor Charles A. Wickliffe, one of several Kentucky governors who served in the War of 1812. Born near Springfield, Kentucky, in 1788, Wickliffe was a Bardstown attorney. There, he…

Historical Marker #837 in Taylorsville recognizes that Spencer County was named after a veteran killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe, which some consider to be the first battle of the War of 1812. Captain Spear Spencer moved to Kentucky from…

Historical Marker #954 in Jamestown commemorates Russell County being named for a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia in 1758, William Russell had been an officer in the Revolutionary War and had fought at the Battle of Kings Mountain before…

Historical Marker #808 in Pikeville commemorates Pike County being named for a War of 1812 general who was killed in action. Born in New Jersey, Zebulon Pike joined the army in 1794 and fought on the frontier. An explorer, in 1805 he traced the…

Historical Marker # 1123 in Calhoun notes that McLean County was named in honor of a War of 1812 veteran who became a state legislator. Born in North Carolina, Alney McLean moved to Kentucky when he was twenty years old. A surveyor in Muhlenberg…

Historical Marker #886 in Louisa commemorates the naming of Lawrence County after a naval hero of the War of 1812. New Jersey native Captain James Lawrence had been in the U.S. Navy since 1798. He advanced steadily through the ranks, and, on June…

While many Kentucky counties are named for Bluegrass State residents who served in the War of 1812, Jackson County was named after President Andrew Jackson, who was a War of 1812 hero from Tennessee. Today, Historical Marker #1145 in McKee…

Some historians consider the Battle of Tippecanoe, fought in Indiana in November 1811, to be the unofficial beginning of the War of 1812. A casualty from that battle, Kentuckian Joseph Hamilton Daviess, was the namesake for Daviess County. …

Historical Marker #836 in Manchester commemorates the naming of Clay County for Green Clay, a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia, according to one biographer, Green Clay "moved to Madison County in the 1780s and established himself as one of…

Historical Marker #1160 in Marion commemorates the namesake of Crittenden County, who was a War of 1812 veteran. John Jordan Crittenden was born in Woodford County in 1787. Called "one of Kentucky's great statesmen," he was governor of Kentucky,…

Historical Marker #831 commemorates Owen County for being named after a casualty of the Battle of Tippecanoe, a fight that some consider to be the unofficial beginning of the War of 1812. Born in Virginia in 1769, Colonel Abraham Owen moved to…

Historical Marker #845 in Brandenburg commemorates the naming of Meade County after a War of 1812 casualty. James M. Meade of Woodford County saw active service throughout the early nineteenth century. As a member of the 17th United States…

Historical Marker #895 in Clinton commemorates Hickman County being named for a War of 1812 casualty. Paschal Hickman moved to Kentucky in 1784. The family settled in Frankfort, and Paschal's house was supposedly "near the railroad tunnel" there.…

Historical Marker #103 in Frankfort commemorates Leestown, a supply base during the War of 1812. The former site of Leestown, located near Wilkinson Boulevard in Frankfort , was first surveyed in 1773. Although pioneers visited the area, in 1775…

Historical Marker #826 in Wickliffe notes the naming of Ballard County after a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia in 1761, Bland Ballard moved to Kentucky in 1779. He quickly saw military service on the frontier, fighting Native Americans. …

Historical Marker #760 in Scottsville commemorates the naming of Allen County after Colonel John Allen, a War of 1812 casualty. Born in 1771 in Rockbridge County, Virginia, Allen's family moved to Kentucky when he was a child. Allen studied law…

Historical Marker #1342 in Bath County commemorates the site of Olympian Springs, a famous resort that was a War of 1812 camp site. Originally known as Mud Lick Springs, the springs' supposed medicinal properties made it a popular site. In the…

Historical Marker #508 in Georgetown commemorates the Battle of the River Raisin, a War of 1812 battle that led to the deaths of dozens of Kentucky soldiers. On August 15, 1812, Kentucky volunteers rendezvoused in Georgetown before marching into…

Historical Marker #43 in Munfordville commemorates the establishment of Hart County, which is named in honor of a War of 1812 veteran. Nathaniel Hart was born in Maryland and moved to Lexington in 1794. In Kentucky, Hart owned a rope factory and…

Historical Marker #1238 recognizes Shelby County being named for Kentucky's first governor, Isaac Shelby, who was also a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Maryland in 1850, Shelby fought in Lord Dunmore's War and the Revolutionary War. In 1780, he…

Historical Marker #1595 in Fayette County recognizes Dr. Samuel Brown, a Lexington chemistry professor and physician who aided America's war effort during the War of 1812. A Virginia native, Brown was exceptionally well-educated for his time,…

Historical Marker #799 in Edmonton commemorates the naming of Metcalfe County for Kentucky Governor Thomas Metcalfe, who was a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia in 1780, Metcalfe lived in Fayette County before settling in Nicholas County. He…

Historical Marker #1284 in Boyle County highlights the community of Perryville and notes that this town was named after a War of 1812 veteran. Originally established in a cave located near the Chaplin River, Perryville was first called Harberson's…

Historical Marker #1194 at the Boone National Guard Center in Frankfort commemorates William Bratton, a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition who later served in the War of 1812. Born in Virginia in 1778, Bratton moved to Kentucky with his…

Kentucky Historical Marker #809 recognizes Letcher County being named for Governor Robert P. Letcher, a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia in 1788, Letcher moved with his family to Garrard County. After studying law, he opened up a practice in…

Historical Markers #871 and #2275, both in Logan County, commemorate the life and burial site of John Littlejohn, the "Guardian of the Declaration of Independence" during the War of 1812. Born in England in 1756, Littlejohn immigrated to America…

Historical Marker #797 in Brownsville commemorates Edmonson County being named for a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia in 1764, John Edmonson was a Revolutionary War Veteran who fought with Virginia militia at the Battle of Kings Mountain in…

Historical Marker #2086 at Locust Grove in Louisville commemorates the family of George Croghan, a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Louisville in 1791, George's mother, Lucy Clark Croghan, was the sister of George Rogers Clark and William Clark (of…

Historical Marker #869 in Mayfield commemorates the establishment of Graves County, which was named in honor of a War of 1812 veteran. Major Benjamin Franklin Graves was born in Virginia in 1771. He moved to Kentucky with his family at age…

Historical Marker #1409 in Shelby County commemorates soldier and statesman General Joseph Winlock. During the Revolutionary War, Winlock joined the American army at age eighteen. Although he enlisted as a private, he quickly moved through the…

Historical Marker #849 in Madisonville commemorates Hopkins County being named in honor of a War of 1812 veteran. Samuel Hopkins, a soldier and politician, was born in Albermarle County, Virginia, in 1753. Hopkins fought in the Revolutionary War,…

Historical Marker #823 in Jessamine County commemorates the birthplace of General William O. Butler, a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Jessamine County in 1791, Butler was raised near present-day Carrollton. Military service was in William's blood. …

Historical Marker #802 in Edmonson County notes the establishment of Brownsville, a city that was likely named for a War of 1812 veteran. During the War of 1812, General Jacob Brown was charged with defending portions of New York State from the…

Historical Marker #1351 in Campbell County commemorates the city of Bellevue, Kentucky, which was named for property owned by a prominent War of 1812 veteran. James Taylor was a banker, politician, extensive land owner, and War of 1812 officer who…

Historical Marker #1849 in Jefferson County notes the boyhood home of "Old Rough and Ready," Zachary Taylor. A veteran of several wars, including the War of 1812, Taylor was the 12th president of the United States. Born in Virginia, Taylor's…

Historical Marker #2021 in Scott County notes the home of Kentucky Governor Joseph Desha, a general during the War of 1812. The Pennsylvania-born Desha moved to Kentucky in 1781. By 1792, Desha was farming in Mason County. After fighting Native…

Historical Marker #1609 in Greenville recognizes war hero Ephraim Brank, a sharpshooter during the War of 1812. A native of North Carolina, Brank moved to Muhlenberg County in 1808. Known as a "crack shot," Brank served in the Kentucky Militia…

Historical Marker #1194 in Boone County recognizes the home site of John Pollard Gaines, a War of 1812 veteran who became governor of Oregon Territory. Born in Virginia, Gaines moved to Kentucky when he was a child. While little is known about…

Historical Marker #1067 in Williamsburg commemorates Whitley County's namesake, Colonel William Whitley. Arguably one of Kentucky's hardest-fighting settlers, Whitley was born in Virginia in 1749. He came to Kentucky in 1775. Although he first…

Historical Marker #918 at Paducah in McCracken County notes the county's namesake, Virgil McCracken, who was killed during the War of 1812. Virgil McCracken's parents were early Kentucky settlers who lived near present-day Frankfort and then in…

Historical Marker #1403 near Burkesville in Cumberland County commemorates John Edward King, a War of 1812 general. Born in Virginia in 1757, King fought in the Revolutionary War, serving in the 3rd Virginia Regiment. In 1780, he moved to…

Historical Marker #1888 in Fayette County recognizes the work of master portrait painter Matthew Harris Jouett, who was also a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Mercer County in 1788, Jouett graduated from Transylvania University before studying law…

Historical Marker #715 in Rockcastle County commemorates the importance of the "Great Saltpeter Cave," a large cave located south of Mt. Vernon. There, organic materials were mined to create gunpowder during the War of 1812. Sulfur, charcoal, and…

Historical Marker #1896 in Franklin County commemorates Governor George Madison, an 1812 veteran who only held office for a few weeks. Born in Virginia in 1763, George was second cousin to U.S. President James Madison. While he had some militia…

Historical Marker #911 in Carroll County commemorates the community of Ghent, Kentucky, which is named for the treaty that ended the War of 1812. The town traces its roots back to 1809. At that time, about thirteen families lived in the area, and…

Historical Marker #2302 in Clark County commemorates Captain Isaac Cunningham, a War of 1812 veteran who was among the first to cultivate bluegrass in Kentucky. A Virginia native, Cunningham commanded a company of Clark and Bourbon county soldiers…

Historical Marker #1128 in Simpsonville commemorates Captain John Simpson, a War of 1812 casualty for whom both Simpsonville and Simpson County are named. Born in Virginia, John Simpson moved to Kentucky when he was a child. The family settled in…

Historical Marker #1205 in Frankfort commemorates the home of John B. Bibb, a War of 1812 officer who is also credited for developing the Bibb variety of lettuce. Born in Virginia, Bibb's family moved to Kentucky, where he became a lawyer. When…

Historical Marker #1652 in Meade County recognizes Solomon Brandenburg, an 1812 veteran for whom the town of Brandenburg is named. An early settler to present-day Meade County, in 1804, Brandenburg purchased 3,000 acres on the Ohio River. There,…

Historical Marker #1125 in Johnson County commemorates the county being named for War of 1812 veteran and U.S. Vice President Richard M. Johnson. Born in 1781 in what is now Jefferson County, Johnson's formative years were spent in Fayette County.…

Historical marker #599 commemorates the Newport Barracks, which was a military prison during the War of 1812. Built in 1804 at the juncture of the Licking and Ohio Rivers, the Newport Barracks was an arsenal and recruiting ground. When the War of…

Historical marker #1139 in Columbia commemorates the naming of Adair County for John Adair, a War of 1812 veteran and Kentucky governor. Born in South Carolina, Adair, a Revolutionary War veteran, moved to Mercer County in 1787. He soon became…

Historical Marker #604 in Adair County commemorates Union Colonel Frank Wolford, a Columbia native who had a controversial military career. Wolford was a vocal opponent of President Abraham Lincoln's policies in Kentucky during the Civil War,…

Historical Marker #1480 in Lexington notes the life of Dr. Robert Peter, whose daughter, Frances, was a unique chronicler of Civil War Lexington. Her diary, A Union Woman in Civil War Kentucky, was published by the University Press of Kentucky. A…

Historical Marker #816 in Robertson County commemorates the naming of that county after George Robertson, a prominent judge who tangled with Abraham Lincoln about slavery during the Civil War. Born in Mercer County in 1780, Robertson was a lawyer,…

Historical Marker #2277 notes Lexington's First Presbyterian Church and one nineteenth century pastor, the Reverend Robert J. Breckinridge. During the Civil War, Kentucky Presbyterian minister Robert J. Breckinridge was an important advisor to…

Historical Marker #2234 in Louisville's Cave Hill Cemetery commemorates Kentucky Governor Thomas E. Bramlette, a Union veteran of the Civil War. Elected in 1863 after an active Civil War career as a Union colonel, Bramlette frequently tangled with…

Historical Marker #786 in Magoffin County commemorates the county being named for Beriah Magoffin, one of Kentucky's Civil War governors. A Harrodsburg lawyer, Magoffin became governor of Kentucky on the eve of the Civil War. Although he…

Historical Marker #603 notes two Union generals who lived in Greensburg, William Ward and Edward Hobson. Born in Virginia, Ward moved to Kentucky where he became a prominent attorney, officer in the Mexican War, legislator, and congressman. When…

Historical Marker #2283 in Shelby County commemorates the massacre of members of the 5th United States Colored Cavalry (USCC) near Simpsonville. On January 25, 1865, Company E of the 5th USCC was transporting a herd of 900 cattle to Louisville. …

Two historical markers--#1515 and #2222---commemorate Camp Nelson in Jessamine County, where most of the state's African American Union soldiers were recruited. Established near Nicholasville in 1863, Camp Nelson was named for Union General…

Historical Marker #1160 in Marion commemorates the namesake of Crittenden County. John Jordan Crittenden was born in Woodford County in 1787. Called "one of Kentucky's great statesmen," he was governor of Kentucky, attorney general under three…

Historical Marker #524 in Monroe County notes when John Hunt Morgan struck Tompkinsville. In July 1862, Morgan raided Kentucky for the first time to disrupt Union lines of communication. On July 9, his two regiments hit Tompkinsville, where they…

Historical Marker #862 in Bath County marks the birthplace of Confederate General John Bell Hood. Born in Owingsville in 1831, Hood graduated from West Point and served on the Texas frontier. When the Civil War erupted, he joined the Confederacy…

Historical Marker #552 in Breckinridge County commemorates Joseph Holt, the Unionist judge advocate general who prosecuted the Lincoln assassination conspirators. Born in Breckinridge County in 1807, Holt practiced law in Kentucky and Missouri. A…

Historical Marker #518 describes the Civil War in Barbourville in Knox County. At the beginning of the Civil War, Unionists established Camp Andy Johnson near Barbourville. Kentuckians and East Tennesseans were recruited there, and, on September…

Historical marker #562 in Simpson County notes the burial location of Marcellus Jerome Clarke--known to history as "Sue Mundy"--one of Kentucky's most infamous pro-Confederate guerrillas. Born near Franklin, Clarke joined the Confederate army with…

Historical Marker #2247 in Greenup County commemorates Camp Swigert, a Union recruiting camp. In December 1861, the 22nd Kentucky Union Infantry Regiment organized at this camp. Recruits came from Louisville and Greenup, Franklin, Carter, Lewis,…

Historical Marker #528 at Columbus-Belmont State Park in Hickman County discusses Columbus's role during the Civil War. In early September 1861, Confederate General Leonidas Polk took Columbus. An important strategic location because of the…

Historical Marker #770 in Butler County notes the birthplace of Confederate soldier Thomas Henry Hines. Called the "most dangerous man of [the] Confederacy," Hines was born near Woodbury on October 9, 1838. A professor at the Masonic University…

Historical Marker #863 in Pulaski County commemorates the Battle of Mill Springs. Fought on January 19, 1862, the battle was an early Union victory that helped break a Confederate defensive line that spanned across southern Kentucky. With…

Historical Marker #531in Clay County commemorates the Goose Creek Salt Works, which were destroyed by Union troops during the Civil War. Salt was a precious commodity to both armies. Therefore, these works, owned by Union Colonel T. T. Garrard,…

Historical Marker #963 in Paducah marks the death of Confederate Colonel A. P. Thompson, who was killed while attacking his hometown. Born in Green County on March 3, 1829, Thompson was a Paducah lawyer who served as McCracken County's…

Historical Marker #1846 in Richmond discusses James B. McCreary, a Confederate veteran who was twice governor of Kentucky. Born in Madison County in 1838, McCreary joined the Confederacy despite opposition from his family. He wrote, "I stand…

Historical Marker #523 commemorates the Battle of Sacramento in McLean County. On December 28, 1861, nearly 300 Confederate cavalry led by Nathan Bedford Forrest attacked about 200 Union horsemen near Sacramento. The battle was Forrest's first…

Historical Marker #1758 in Kenton County commemorates Union General Ormsby Mitchel, the namesake of Fort Mitchell, Kentucky. During the Civil War, several dozen earthen fortifications were constructed to protect Cincinnati and northern Kentucky. …

Historical Marker #1750 commemorates Camp Dick Robinson, a Garrard County recruiting camp that was instrumental in keeping Kentucky in the Union. Established on the farm of Richard Robinson in August 1861 by Union officer and Maysville native…

Historical Marker #1218 commemorates Boyle County for being named after Judge John Boyle, a state representative, congressman, and prominent judge. Boyle's son--Jeremiah Tilford Boyle--became Union military commander of Kentucky for much of the…

Historical Marker #534 in Louisville notes the birthplace of Robert Anderson, the commander of Ft. Sumter and the "first Union hero of [the] Civil War." Born in 1805 at "Soldiers Retreat" in Jefferson County, Anderson was a West Point…

Historical Marker #501 commemorates the Battle of Augusta, Kentucky. Although smaller than most battles fought that year, this action changed the course of a major military campaign. When Confederate armies invaded Kentucky in 1862, Confederate…

Historical Marker #951 in Clark County notes the fratricidal nature of Kentucky's Civil War. Five Hanson brothers fought on opposite sides, and two of them, Roger and Charles, attained prominence. Roger Hanson was born in Winchester on…

Historical Marker #2160, placed near Munfordville in Hart County, notes the strategic importance of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Bridge over the Green River during the Civil War. An engineering marvel of its day, the 1,800-foot-long…

Historical Marker #1910 in Christian County commemorates Kentucky governor Charles Slaughter Morehead, who practiced law in Hopkinsville prior to the Civil War. During the conflict, Morehead was arrested and imprisoned by Union authorities during…

Historical Markers #85 and #2093 commemorate the Battle of Middle Creek, fought near Prestonsburg on January 10, 1862. The battle was crucial in the struggle to control the Big Sandy Valley, and future U. S. president James Garfield won an early…

Historical Marker #2244 in Danville commemorates John Todd Stuart, who was Abraham Lincoln's first law partner. When Abraham Lincoln moved to Springfield, Illinois, Kentuckian John Todd Stuart encouraged Lincoln to study law. He also became…

Historical Marker #522 in Frankfort commemorates the installation of Richard Hawes as Kentucky's second Confederate governor. The ceremony took place at the Old State Capitol in Frankfort in 1862. That year, several Confederate armies invaded…

Historical Marker #192 in Boyle County commemorates a Perryville resident who made great sacrifices during the Civil War. Henry Bottom was a farmer and justice of the peace whose home was caught in the crossfire of Kentucky's largest battle. …

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