Historical marker #2532 commemorates the history and people of Eastern Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in Louisville. It was first documented as a burial ground in the 1840s before it was formally incorporated by the Methodist Episcopal Church…

Historical marker #2541 celebrates the life and contributions of Samuel Cox, 1756-1832. Cox was an early resident in what became Whitley County and became a leading promoter of the settlement of Williamsburg. Much of the current town is located on…

Historical marker #2544 commemorates one of the first-established and longest-running farms in Bourbon County and the whole of the Commonwealth, Townsend Springs Farm. In 1775, John Townsend traveled with Captain John Hinkston down the Ohio River…

Historical marker #2551 commemorates the Wisertown settlement that once existed along St. Andrew's Church Road in southwestern Jefferson County. When John Wiser moved to the area in 1817, he was one of the early white settlers to make their homes in…

Kentucky Historical Marker #2520 celebrates the history of black barber shops in Frankfort, focusing particularly on the contributions that Mr. Robert Lee Taylor made to the local community. The barber shop that eventually became Mr. Taylor's started…

Marker #2032 recounts some of the history of the Berrytown Cemetery in Jefferson County. The cemetery functioned as a central cultural institution for the Berrytown community after it was established in the late nineteenth century. The United…

Marker #1982 celebrates the history of the Berrytown community in Jefferson County. What became known as Berrytown started when the formerly enslaved Alfred Berry purchased five acres in eastern Jefferson County from Samuel L. Nock in 1874. Nock was…

Historical marker #1985 notes the history of the Smoketown community of Jefferson County. What became known as "Smoketown" in Louisville got its start in the immediate post-Civil War era as thousands of black Kentuckians moved to Louisville in search…

Historical marker #1988 celebrated the communities of Petersburg and Newburg in Jefferson County. Unfortuantely, the marker is no longer standing.  Before this area became Petersburg or Newburg, it was known as Wet Woods due to the swampy prevailing…

Historical marker #2052 celebrates the community of Jonesville in Warren County. For nearly a century following Emancipation, from the 1860s through the 1950s, Jonesville was home to a vibrant black community. Founded by formerly enslaved men and…

Griffytown’s history stretches back to the late nineteenth century when Dan Griffith, a freedman, moved a log cabin to Old Harrod's Creek Road.  According to local oral tradition, the formerly-enslaved Daniel Griffith purchased a wooden home from…

Historical marker #2267 celebrates the history of the Zion Hill community and Zion Hill School in Scott County. The village of Zion Hill dates back to the antebellum era, prior to Emancipation and the end of slavery in Kentucky. The community was…

Historical marker #1938 commemorates the New Zion community in Scott County. The roots of the African American community of New Zion stretch back to 1872 when two formerly enslaved men bought land on which to make their homes. Ultimately, the 23…

Historical marker #2348 commemorates the long and varied history of the structure at 215 Walnut Street in Midway. Constructed in 1872, the building originally served as the home of the Colored Baptist Church, which later changed to Pilgrim…

Historical marker #2074 in Jefferson County commemorates the history of the orignal African American section of Parkland. The boundaries of the community known as “Little Africa” in Jefferson County vary depending on the source and the era being…

“You'd better watch out. You'd better not cry. You’d better not pout. I’m telling you way—Santa Claus is coming to town.” This holiday warning, delivered to children annually from November to December 25, calls to mind the North Pole, chimneys across…

Historical Marker #2529 commemorates the vibrant history of the First English Lutheran Church of Louisville. Established by fourteen founding members in 1872, the church set out to practice their religion in English in a thoroughly German portion of…

Believed to be pregnant with twins at the age of forty-five, Crawford and her local doctors discovered something was amiss as her purported due date came and went without any sign of birth. Dr. Ephraim McDowell who had already earned regional acclaim…

Joseph Logsdon, who grew to earn the nickname "Big Joe," was born in Virginia and moved to the Kentucky frontier as a young man. The path his life took resembled the broader currents of westward migration that shaped the country in the late…

Historical Marker #2527 celebrates the 100+ years that the Family Services Assocaition of Boyle County has worked to improve the lives of local residents. Founded in the second decade of the twentieth century, the organization that became the Family…

Historical Marker #173 commemorates a Civil War raid led by James J. Andrews.Andrews, a civilian resident of Flemingsburg, proposed and organized a raid to seize a Confederate locomotive and destroy supply and communication lines between Atlanta and…

Historical marker #2189 celebrates the Second Christian Church of Midway. This is believed to be the oldest black Disciples of Christ congregation in Kentucky and started in 1832. Prior to taking the name the Second Christian Church of Midway, it was…

Historical Marker #2509 commemorates the life of Henry Tureman Allen.Allen's life and accomplishments spanned the transition from the eighteenth to the nineteenth century. Born in antebellum Sharpsburg in 1859, his earliest years coincided with the…

Historical Marker #2489 commemorates the life of Colonel John Dils, Jr. John Dils, Jr. was one of the most successful men in antebellum Pike County. Upon arriving in the region from northern Virginia around 1840, Dils spent some time as a…

Historical maker #2526 commemorates the original home of St. Michael's Parish, the third Catholic parish established in the state of Kentucky. St. Michael's, located in Fairfield in Nelson County, served as an incubator for Catholicism in the state.…

Historical marker #2521 commemorates the life of Willis A. "Mose" Lee Jr. Lee was an Owen County native whose accomplishments had largely faded from public memory until a group of middle schoolers restored the Vice Admiral to a prominent place in the…

Whether known as the Montgomery Street School, the Emma Dolfinger School, the Portland Christian School, or simply "The Dolfinger," this building has played central parts in the Portland neighborhood and broader Kentucky history. For more than 160…

Historical Marker #1728 marks Dils Cemetery in Pikeville. Dils Cemetery is the resting place of Randolph and Sarah McCoy, as well as their daughter, Roseanna, son, Sam, and Sam’s wife, Martha.  Each of these McCoys had their lives shaped by the feud…

Historical Marker #1913 commemorates one of the last incidents in the Hatfield-McCoy feud. Ellison Mounts, a poor twenty-five-year-old who took part in the raid of the McCoy’s home in 1888, was found guilty of the murder of Alifair McCoy (event…

Historical Marker #1866 marks the Pike County Courthouse and Jail, where members of the Hatfield family were tried and found guilty of the murders of Tolbert, Randolph, Jr., Pharmer, Alifair, and Calvin McCoy. In September 1889, the bloody results of…