Historical Marker #598 in Simpson County notes the movement of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry while in the area during the Confederate invasion of Kentucky during the summer and fall of 1862. In the summer of 1862, John Hunt Morgan made a raid…

Historical Marker #912 in Franklin notes Simpson County’s namesake, War of 1812 veteran, Captain John Simpson. Simpson, a native of Virginia, came to Kentucky as child with his family. The Simpsons settled in Lincoln County and John attended a…

Historical Marker #2132 in Franklin remembers the birthplace of noted church hymnist Thomas Obadiah Chisholm. T.O. Chisholm was born into a turbulent world on July 29, 1866. The Civil War had ended the year before, but yet random acts of violence…

Historical Marker #1271 in Franklin remembers the service of politician Beverly Leonidas Clarke to the state and nation. Beverly L. Clarke was born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, in 1809. In 1823, he moved with his family to Christian County,…

Historical Marker #2402 in Franklin notes the birthplace of Alexander Majors, a co-founder of the Pony Express. Long before Horace Greely coined the phrase “Go West, young man!” generations had already started looking toward the western…

Historical Marker #1947 in Simpson County remembers native son James Bowie, who died at the Alamo in 1836, and that county’s 1869 redrawn boundary with neighboring Logan County. “Remember the Alamo!” is a phrase that has been passed down…

Historical marker #1517 in Whitley County celebrates the Kiwanis Trail that connects Corbin to the Cumberland Falls. The Cumberland Falls is a large waterfall in southeastern Kentucky. On October 21, 1921, the Corbin Kiwanis Club was founded and…

Historic marker #919 in Whitley County commemorates the heroism of Charles H. Gatliff and his wife Christina Gatliff. Captain Charles Gatliff was an early pioneer and settler in Kentucky. On May 28, 1748, he was born in Virginia to James and…

Historic marker #898 in Whitley County notes the early surveying expedition of Dr. Thomas Walker and his companions through southeastern Kentucky. In April 1750, Dr. Thomas Walker and his small group of pioneers ventured into southeastern…

Historic marker #672 in Whitley County commemorates the heroics of Julia Marcum during the Civil War. Born on November 7, 1844, Julia Marcum grew up in Scott County, Tennessee. Her parents were Hiram and Permelia (Huff) Marcum. The family lived…

Historic marker #513 in Whitley County notes the skirmish that occurred in Williamsburg, Kentucky during the Civil War. On July 25, 1863, Confederate Colonel John S. Scott and his men were met by a group from the Union’s 44th Ohio Infantry in a…

Historic marker #2102 in Whitley County recounts the history of Clyde V. and Patricia Bennett Building on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. In 1906, the…

Historic marker #2101 in Whitley County recounts the history of Gillespie Hall on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. Originally built in 1893, Gillespie Hall…

Historic marker #2100 in Whitley County recounts the history of Roburn Hall on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. Roburn Hall was the first building on the…

Historic marker #2084 in Whitley County recounts the history of Mahan Hall on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. In 1906, Cumberland College built Felix…

Historic marker #2002 in Whitley County notes the accomplishments of the Civilian Conservation Corps at Cumberland Falls during the Great Depression. In 1929, the stock market crashed and sent the world into the Great Depression. During these…

Historic marker #1975 notes the history of the Sharpe family and their contributions to Whitley County. The Sharpe family land in Whitley began with John Sharpe. He was a veteran of the War of 1812. After the war, around 1817, Sharpe moved to the…

Historical marker #1837 in Whitley County notes the founding and expansion of the University of the Cumberlands. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. Cumberland College was originally founded under the…

Historical marker #1801 in Whitley County celebrates the natural phenomenon of the moonbow at the Cumberland Falls. Officially becoming a state park in 1931, the Cumberland Falls State Park sits on the Cumberland River with a large waterfall…

Historic marker #2404 in McCracken County celebrates the history of the Woodland School, a Rosenwald School for African American children. Over two decades, Julius Rosenwald, philanthropist and CEO of Sears Roebuck, worked with Booker T.…

Historical Marker #741 in Lexington notes the political and military career of John Cabell Breckinridge, who at age thirty-six was the youngest vice president in U.S. history. John C. Breckinridge’s promising future started at an early age. He…

Historical Marker #1110 in Fayette County notes the strange happenstance that made Kentucky native David Rice Atchison the symbolic president of the United States for a day in 1849. David Rice Atchison was born in Fayette County in 1807. After…

Historical Marker #1780 in Fayette County remembers native Kentucky artist Thomas Satterwhite Noble. The study of history occasionally introduces us to individuals that defy convention. These people remind us of the importance of avoiding…

Historical Marker #3 in Lexington commemorates the Morgan House. This house, built by businessman John Wesley Hunt in 1814, has been the home of Hunt’s daughter and her husband Henrietta and Calvin Morgan and their son John Hunt Morgan, and was…

Historical Marker #1888 in Lexington remembers Kentucky portraitist Matthew Harris Jouett, who painted some of Kentucky’s most well known nineteenth century personalities. Matthew Harris Jouett was born in Mercer County in 1788 to Capt. John…

Historical Marker #2238 in Fayette County notes the origins of Maddoxtown, a rural freedman’s community that developed during Reconstruction. For its first seventy plus years slavery was the dominant labor system of Kentucky. And while the Civil…

Historical Marker #1550 in Lexington notes that city’s historic cemetery, which was dedicated in 1850. The mid-nineteenth century witnessed a rise in the construction of garden-style landscaped cemeteries. At that time people’s understanding…

Historical Marker #1163 in Fayette County remembers the significance of hemp to the county’s nineteenth century economy. Early settlers to Kentucky’s Bluegrass Region found that hemp grew well in the area’s nutrient-rich, well-drained soil.…

Historical Marker #17 in Fayette County commemorates Boone’s Station, a community founded by frontiersman Daniel Boone. Settling the Kentucky frontier was a daunting task. The earliest of those hearty souls that voluntarily came across the…

Historical Marker #945 in Lexington notes the Shryock family of architects, whose Kentucky buildings have become iconic reminders of the nineteenth century. Carpenter Mathias Shryock moved to Kentucky from Frederick County, Maryland, in the…