Historical Marker #1183 commemorates three Daviess County Confederate soldiers who were honored by Confederate President Jefferson Davis during the Civil War. Albert M. Hathaway, John L. Bell, and Mathias Garrett were three of seventy-two Kentucky…

Historical Marker #1918 commemorates the Hawes family and their contributions to Daviess County’s history, particularly in the Yelvington area. Richard and Clary Hawes settled in the Yelvington/Maceo area in 1810. They arrived three years…

Historical Marker #1081 marks the site of property that belonged to George Mason, the author of the Virginia Bill of Rights and Constitution. Although he owned about 60,000 acres of land in Daviess County, he died in 1792 without ever having visited…

Historical Marker #883 marks the home of Colonel Joseph Hamilton Daviess, a farm called “Cornland”, located on the Ohio River a mile and a half east of Owensboro. The original residence was a hewn log house, although none of that remains…

Historical Marker #744 marks the site of the first permanent settlement in Owensboro, settled by Bill Smothers (also known as Bill Smeathers) in 1797-98. Bill Smothers served in Kentucky’s “Corn Stalk Militia” as an ensign before becoming a…

Historical Marker #590, located on the courthouse lawn, notes the burning of the Daviess County courthouse on January 4, 1865, by a band of Civil War guerrillas. Formerly a captain in the 7th Kentucky Union Infantry Regiment, William "Bill"…

Historical Marker #774 commemorates the namesake of Lincoln County, Benjamin Lincoln, an American general during the Revolutionary War. Although Lincoln County was named after him, General Lincoln was not from, nor did he live, in Lincoln County…

Historical Marker #2135 in Lincoln County marks the home of noted teacher Sophia Alcorn, who worked extensively with hearing and vision impaired students during the early twentieth century. Born in Stanford in Lincoln County on August 3, 1883,…

Historical Marker #1105 in McCracken County marks the place where Kentucky politician Linn Boyd's home stood. Boyd, who moved to Paducah in 1852, built this brick home and called it Oaklands. Boyd was born in Nashville, Tennessee, on November 22,…

Historical Marker #1112 in Paducah marks the grave of Alben W. Barkley, who was vice president in President Harry S. Truman's administration. When giving a speech at a student convention in Virginia, Barkley famously stated, "I would rather be a…