Historical Marker #1373 in Calloway County commemorates Gerard Furnace, an important producer of pig iron in the far western part of Kentucky during the mid-nineteenth century. The production of pig iron was well suited for Kentucky's rolling…

Historical Marker #1263 in Murray commemorates the history of the first courthouse constructed in Calloway County. The Calloway County courthouse originally functioned as a one room log structure and was built in 1823, one year after the county…

Historical Marker #825 in Murray honors early Kentucky explorer and settler Richard Callaway. Calloway County (spelled differently), which was established in 1822, is named for this pioneer adventurer. The exact year of Richard Callaway's birth…

Historical Marker #1977 on the Murray State University campus commemorates the life of Calloway County native and literary critic Cleanth Brooks. In the twentieth century, Brooks and other writers challenged conventionality in the fields of…

Historical Marker #1945 at Kirksey in Calloway County commemorates the history of Calloway Normal College, a teachers' school that operated from 1899 to 1913. The term "normal" was popularly used in the nineteenth and early twentieth century to…

Historical Marker #690 in Floyd County remembers Solomon Stratton, founder of the Stratton Settlement. Solomon Stratton was born about 1745 in Amherst County, Virginia. During the Revolutionary War, Stratton was a member of a local militia unit…

Historical Marker #2117 in Prestonsburg commemorates the historic toll bridge fondly known as the "Old Red Bridge." In the early 1800s, Prestonsburg was a small but growing community. In 1810, only six families resided in town. The town quickly…

Historical Marker #623 in Prestonsburg remembers Confederate General John Hunt Morgan's last raid into Kentucky during the Civil War. After Morgan was captured on an extended cavalry raid into Indiana and Ohio in the summer of 1863, he served…

Historical Marker #905 in Floyd County notes one of the most unique tracts of land in Kentucky. Floyd County was originally composed of 3,600 square miles of land when it was founded in 1799. Throughout the nineteenth century, sections of the…

Historical Marker #172 in Prestonsburg notes the location of the house built in 1857 by John M. Burns, which was used as a temporary headquarters for Colonel James Garfield after the Battle of Middle Creek. James Garfield was born into a modest…

Historical Marker #817 in Prestonsburg remembers the life of Captain John Floyd, for whom Floyd County is named. Floyd County, located in the eastern part of the state, was the fortieth county established. Named for John Floyd, a Virginia…

Historical Marker #151 in Floyd County notes the discovery of a salt spring by famous explorer Daniel Boone. Boone found the spring during an extended hunting expedition into what would become Kentucky. Salt was a vital commodity in colonial…

Historical Marker #164 near Prestonsburg commemorates the Battle of Ivy Mountain, an early Union victory in the Civil War. The first year of the conflict brought several reverses to Union forces. In the summer of 1861, the first large battle of…

Historical Marker #1193 in Owingsville notes the history of the Owings House and it original owner, Thomas Deye Owings. Before the town of Owingsville was founded, most of the surrounding land was owned by either politician Richard Menefee or…

Historical Marker #1342 at Olympian Springs in Bath County notes the history of this fashionable and well-attended resort, which served patrons for more than one hundred years. The fascination with mineral springs and their perceived curative…

Historical Marker #1542, near Bethel in Bath County, remembers the life of one of Kentucky's most notable newspaper writers. Joe Cross Creason was born in Benton, Kentucky, on June 10, 1918. After graduating from the University of Kentucky, and…

Historical Marker #592 in Owingsville notes the accidental burning of the Bath County courthouse by Union troops in 1864. While the Civil War disrupted the lives of many Americans, those who lived in the border states, like Kentucky, often…

Historical Marker #1050 near the town of Salt Lick in Bath County remembers the prodigious output of Clear Creek Furnace. Built in 1839 by W. A. Lane and W. S. Allen, the furnace operated until its last blast in 1875. Production of iron at the…

Historical Marker #1528 in Owingsville provides a tribute to the life of Revolutionary War hero, Captain John "Jack" Jouett, Jr. Jack Jouett was born in Virginia on December 7, 1754. During the Revolutionary War, Jouett served as captain in the…

Historical Marker #1226 in Bath County includes a history of the furnace built on Caney Fork, a branch of the Licking River. Harrison Connor and Joshua Ewing, Sr., began constructing the Caney Furnace in 1837. Ewing operated the Bourbon Iron…

Historical Marker #993 in Bath County notes the history of the Bourbon Iron Works, which was built by Jacob Myers in 1791. Myers moved from Virginia to what would become Kentucky in the early 1780s. Upon his arrival, he purchased thousands of…

Historical Marker #940 in Owingsville notes several important and influential personalities from the history of Bath County. Founded in 1811, Bath County is named for its mineral and medicinal springs. The famous Olympian Springs resort was a…