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Stories by author "McKenzie Martin": 65

Historical Marker #2387 in Harlan County commemorates the Pine Mountain Settlement School, a National Historic Landmark that opened in 1913. Beginning as a combination social settlement and boarding school for local youth, Pine Mountain…

Historical Marker #2317 in Jefferson County commemorates the Louisville Water Company Filtration Plant, Reservoir, and Gatehouse. The Louisville Water Company was chartered by the Kentucky General Assembly on March 6, 1854. It became the…

Historical Marker #2086 in Jefferson County commemorates the Locust Grove estate. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1986, Locust Grove was the home of William Croghan and his wife, Lucy Clark Croghan. Lucy was the sister of the…

Historical Marker #1601 in Kenton County commemorates the Roebling Suspension Bridge, the first bridge to span the Ohio River. Opened to traffic on January 1, 1867, the bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world at the time. The cost of…

Historical Marker #1520 in Madison County commemorates Fort Boonesborough, the early frontier settlement established by Daniel Boone and Richard Henderson in April 1775. Boonesborough was first envisioned by Colonel Richard Henderson of the…

Historical Marker #1406 in Fayette County commemorates Old Morrison, a National Historic Landmark located on the campus of Transylvania University. Morrison Hall was erected to replace the university's previous administration building, which was…

Historical Marker #558 in Leslie County commemorates the Frontier Nursing Service. Founded in 1925 by Mary Breckinridge, the Frontier Nursing Service provided medical services to remote areas of southeastern Kentucky. The organization eventually…

Historical Marker #88 in Jefferson County celebrates the Old Bank of Louisville building. Constructed in 1837, this National Historic Landmark is an excellent example of the Greek Revival-style of architecture. Notable architect Gideon Shyrock…

Historical Marker #50 in Kenton County marks the boyhood home of Daniel Carter Beard, who founded the Sons of Daniel Boone, a forerunner to the Boy Scouts of America. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 21, 1850, Beard grew up in nearby Covington,…

Historical Marker #2359 in Leslie County remembers the Finley Mine disaster at Hurricane Creek in December 1970. Located four miles east of Hyden, Kentucky, the mine loaded an average of 1,500 tons of coal per day. Exactly one year prior to the…

Historical Marker #2130 in Pike County commemorates the connection of the Chesapeake & Ohio (C&O) Railroad and the Carolina, Clinchfield & Ohio Railroad (later Clinchfield) at Elkhorn City. When the junction was completed in 1915, Elkhorn City became…

Historical Marker #1803 in Harlan County commemorates Lynch, the largest company-owned town in Kentucky through World War II. Lynch was established by the U.S. Coal and Coke Company, a subsidiary of the United States Steel Company, in 1917. The…

Historical Marker #1338 in Hopkins County celebrates Earlington, a western Kentucky coal town. Founded in 1870 by the St. Bernard Coal Co., Earlington was named for John B. Earle, who was credited with having stuck the first pick into the hillside…

Historical Marker #1272 commemorates Wallsend Coal Mine, the first to begin operation in Bell County. Commercial enterprises expanded in Bell County when the Louisville and Nashville Railroad was extended from Corbin to Pineville in 1888. The…

Historical Markers #1178 and #1978 in Greenup County commemorate the Eastern Kentucky Railway, which played an important part in developing the area's coal, iron, and timber resources. The Eastern Kentucky Railway was originally chartered in…

Historical Marker #743 in Daviess County commemorates Robert Triplett, a coal magnate who constructed the first railway in the state. Triplett was a Virginian who arrived in the Owensboro area around 1817. He was employed to survey land claims,…

Historical Marker #985 in Johnson County remembers noted historian William Elsey Connelley. Born on March 5, 1855, on a prong of the Middle Fork of Jennie's Creek, Connelley received his earliest training from his parents. Overcoming a…

Historical Marker #556 in Johnson County remembers a Civil War skirmish at Paintsville, which led to the subsequent engagement at Half Mountain in Magoffin County. On April 12, 1864, Union Colonel George W. Gallup arrived in Paintsville,…

Historical Marker #2309 in Henderson County commemorates former Kentucky Governor Albert B. "Happy" Chandler. During two terms in the governor's office, Chandler oversaw improvements in schools, roads, health and welfare programs, and penal…

Historical Marker #2220 in Henderson County commemorates the famed explorers Lewis and Clark and their journey through Henderson County. Robert Frazer, who joined Lewis and Clark on their expedition, visited Henderson several times after the…

Historical Marker #1926 in Henderson County commemorates Fernwood Cemetery, the final resting place of several prominent Kentuckians. Lazarus Powell was born in Henderson County in 1812. Powell graduated from St. Joseph's College in Bardstown…

Historical Marker #1777 in Henderson County commemorates Augustus Owsley Stanley, a Kentucky governor and U.S. congressman who used his charisma and colorful oratorical skills to win elected office. Born in Shelbyville on May 21, 1867, to William…

Historical Marker #1523 in Henderson County remembers John James Audubon, who is best known for his paintings of nature, especially birds, and his publication, "Birds of America." Audubon traveled across the country in his attempt to study and…

Historical Marker #1206 commemorates the formation of Henderson County. Located in western Kentucky along the Ohio River, Henderson County was the thirty-eighth county to be formed. Henderson County was named for Colonel Richard Henderson, the…

Historical Marker #717 in Henderson County commemorates General Samuel Hopkins, a Revolutionary War veteran who helped establish Henderson County. Born in Albermarle County, Virginia, in 1753, Samuel was the son of Dr. Samuel Hopkins and Isabella…

Historical Marker #191 in Henderson County remembers Mary Towles Sasseen Wilson, a Henderson school teacher who is recognized as the first person to celebrate Mother's Day in 1887. Mary was born March 5, 1860, in Henderson, Kentucky. The oldest…

Historical Marker #66 in Henderson commemorates the Transylvania Company. Formed by Richard Henderson, the Transylvania Company was created to settle the area around the Kentucky, Ohio, and Cumberland rivers. The Company is also credited for…

Historical Marker #2158 in Warren County remembers Shake Rag, an African American community founded in the 1800s. Shake Rag was added to the National Register of Historic Places in September 2000, becoming Bowling Green’s first National…

Historical Marker #1882 in Warren County remembers James Turner Morehead, the first native Kentuckian to serve as governor. Born in Bullitt County on May 24, 1797, Morehead was raised in Logan County. After attending local schools, Morehead…

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