Historical Marker #1831 in Warren County commemorates Duncan Hines. The man behind the legendary cake mix was also known for his series of guidebooks that helped travelers make dining, lodging, and vacation decisions. Hines was born on March 26,…

Historical Marker #1024 in Warren County discusses the occupation of Bowling Green by Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War. Although Kentucky officially adopted a position of neutrality at the beginning of the conflict, the policy…

Historical Marker #997 in Warren County commemorates the 1798 founding of Bowling Green by Robert Moore. The city of Bowling Green was founded after two brothers, George and Robert Moore, moved to the area from Virginia in 1796. The next year,…

Historical Marker #987 recognizes the formation of Warren County. The twenty-fourth county in order of formation, it is named for Major General Joseph Warren. Born near Boston on June 11, 1741, Warren entered Harvard at age fourteen. He studied…

Historical Marker #769 in Warren County marks the home of lawyer and Civil War captain Thomas Henry Hines. Hines was born in Butler County, Kentucky, on October 9, 1838. While Hines had little formal schooling, his education was acquired outside…

Historical Marker #538 in Warren County commemorates the Union capture of Bowling Green on February 14, 1862. On September 18, 1861, Confederate General Simon Bolivar Buckner and nearly five thousand troops marched on Bowling Green. Capturing…

Historical Marker #67 in Warren County discusses Bowling Green's role as the state capital of Kentucky's Provisional Confederate government. Few states were as bitterly divided as Kentucky during the Civil War. The commonwealth's unique position…

Historical Marker #1698 in McCracken County commemorates John T. Scopes, who made national headlines as the defendant in the famous Tennessee "Monkey Trial." Scopes was born in Paducah, Kentucky, on August 3, 1900. After moving to Illinois in…

Historical Marker #1134 in McCracken County celebrates the historic Illinois Central Railroad. Rail played a significant role in the growth and expansion of western Kentucky through the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Paducah served as…

Historical Marker #1053 in McCracken County commemorates the devastating flood of 1937. This flood led to some 27,000 citizens to be evacuated and caused several million dollars' worth of damage. January 1937 opened with a two-week period of…

Historical Marker #1043 in McCracken County remembers Confederate General Lloyd Tilghman. Tilghman was born in Maryland on January 26, 1818. At age fifteen, he entered the United States Military Academy at West Point and graduated five years…

Historical Marker #1006 in McCracken County commemorates the Jackson Purchase. This land, which was secured in 1818, includes Kentucky's eight westernmost counties, including McCracken County. The purchase was primarily negotiated by two agents…

Historical Marker #680 commemorates Alben W. Barley and his beloved estate, Angles, in McCracken County. Barkley was born on November 24, 1877, in a Graves County log cabin to tenant farmers John Wilson and Electra Eliza Barkley. In 1892, Barkley…

Historical Marker #517 in McCracken County recalls Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest's raid on Paducah in March 1864. The journey to Paducah from western Tennessee began in the spring of 1864. Forrest was intent on reaching Kentucky to…

Historical Marker # 1632 in Johnson County remembers entrepreneur John Caldwell Calhoun Mayo as a "dreamer" and a "doer." Born in Pike County on September 16, 1864, the Mayo family moved to Paintsville in Johnson County when John was five years…

Historical Marker #1126 commemorates the town of Paintsville, the county seat of Johnson County. Located at the junction of the Big Sandy River and Paint Creek, the first Anglo visitors arrived in 1750, when Dr. Thomas Walker led an expedition…

Historical Marker #1125 in Johnson County commemorates the naming of the county after Richard Mentor Johnson, a lawyer, soldier, and U.S. Vice President. Johnson was born on October 17, 1781, at Beargrass, a frontier settlement in present-day…

Historical Marker #903 in Johnson County commemorates Dr. Thomas Walker and his first expedition through the Cumberland Gap into Kentucky. While on this expedition, Dr. Walker and his companions camped at present-day Paintsville in 1750. Thomas…

Historical Marker #736 in Johnson County commemorates Harman Station, the first permanent settlement in eastern Kentucky. Matthias Harman, a Pennsylvania-born Virginian, became acquainted with Kentucky's Big Sandy River valley in the mid 1700s.…

Historical Marker #735 in Johnson County commemorates Jenny (Jennie) Wiley and her daring escape from the Native Americans who held her captive for nearly a year. Virginia Sellards Wiley was born about 1760 in Pennsylvania. When Jennie was a…

Historical Marker #700 in Johnson County commemorates John Hunt Morgan's 1864 retreat through Paintsville to Virginia. This was during Morgan's last Kentucky raid during the Civil War. Morgan's command consisted of approximately 2,700 men. On…

Historical Marker #608 in Johnson County commemorates arrival of Union troops in Paintsville in January 1862. That month, those soldiers fought in the Battle of Middle Creek in Floyd County, which proved to be an important Union victory. In…

Historical Marker #571 in Johnson County commemorates Jennie's Creek, which is named for the famed frontier heroine Virginia Wiley. The creek was named for Wiley after she crossed the water to escape from Native Americans who had held her captive. …

Historical Marker #1854 in Kenton County remembers Frank Duvenek, a world renowned artist and teacher. Duveneck was born in Covington on October 9, 1848, to German parents Bernard and Katherine Decker. Frank's father died while Frank was an…

Historical Marker #1709 in Kenton County remembers William Goebel, a lawyer and politician who began his career in Covington. Goebel was born in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, on January 4, 1856. Within a decade, after his father returned from service in…

Historical Marker #1601 in Kenton County commemorates the Roebling Suspension Bridge, the first bridge to span the Ohio River. Opened to traffic on January 1, 1867, at the time the bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world. The cost of…

Historical Marker #1594 in Kenton County marks the home of Jesse and Hannah Grant, the parents of President Ulysses S. Grant. The Grant family lived there from 1859 to 1873. Jesse Root Grant married Hannah Simpson on June 24, 1821, in Clermont…

Historical Marker #1488 in Kenton County remembers noted historian Richard Henry Collins. Collins was born on May 4, 1824, in Maysville, Kentucky, to Lewis and Eleanor Collins. His father, a judge and journalist, had also authored the "most…

Historical Marker #1460 in Kenton County commemorates the Mother of God Catholic Church in Covington as being the "Cradle of the Arts." The church, which was the second Catholic church to be erected in Covington, was the mother-parish to several…

Historical Marker #1168 commemorates the namesake of Kenton County, General Simon Kenton, who was an explorer and pioneer of early Kentucky. Born in Virginia on April 3, 1755, Kenton received no formal schooling as a boy, causing him to remain…