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Stories by author "Sanders": 93

Historical Marker #49 at Constitution Square in Danville commemorates the site of Kentucky's earliest district court sessions. Before 1792, Kentucky was part of Virginia. Therefore, ten years before statehood, Virginia law created the Kentucky…

Historical Marker #197 in Danville commemorates the founding of the Kentucky School for the Deaf (KSD), "the first state-supported school in the United States for the instruction of deaf children." In the early nineteenth century, General Elias…

Historical marker #190 in Danville commemorates the town's namesake, Walker Daniel. One who knew Daniel called him "a young gentleman of rare talents," and one who "gave promise of great distinction." Sadly, Daniel was killed in 1784, a casualty of…

Historical Marker #1606, located at the Boyle County Courthouse in Danville, commemorates John Marshall Harlan, a Boyle County native, Civil War veteran, and U.S. Supreme Court justice. Born a few miles west of Danville in 1833, Harlan's family…

Historical Marker #1442 notes that Trinity Episcopal Church is "one of the oldest church buildings in Danville." Constructed in 1830 by resident Robert Russel Jr., the early members of the church included Dr. Ephraim McDowell, who performed the…

Historical Marker #24 commemorates Danville native Theodore O'Hara, a Civil War veteran and poet who wrote the famous poem "The Bivouac of the Dead." Today, O'Hara's poem is inscribed on monuments across the nation, including the gates of Arlington…

Historical Marker #2005 in Danville commemorates Jacobs Hall, a structure at the Kentucky School for the Deaf (KSD). The marker also recognizes the namesake of the building, John A. Jacobs, who was "KSD's first trained teacher, principal, [and]…

Historical Marker #754 commemorates the Danville Presbyterian Church, which was used as a hospital following the Battle of Perryville. When the Reverend David Rice traveled through pioneer Kentucky, he saw a need for churches. "I found scarcely…

Historical marker #756, located at the Boyle County Courthouse in Danville, commemorates the occupation of the structure as a field hospital during the Civil War. When the Battle of Perryville was fought ten miles from Danville on October 8,…

Historical Marker #923 in Danville commemorates Centre College, an institution of higher learning that the Washington Post has called "one of the premier intellectual gathering points in its region." Founded in 1819 by former governor Isaac…

Historical Marker #1604 in Bardstown notes the home of Governor Charles A. Wickliffe, one of several Kentucky governors who served in the War of 1812. Born near Springfield, Kentucky, in 1788, Wickliffe was a Bardstown attorney. There, he…

Historical Marker #837 in Taylorsville recognizes that Spencer County was named after a veteran killed at the Battle of Tippecanoe, which some consider to be the first battle of the War of 1812. Captain Spear Spencer moved to Kentucky from…

Historical Marker #954 in Jamestown commemorates Russell County being named for a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia in 1758, William Russell had been an officer in the Revolutionary War and had fought at the Battle of Kings Mountain before…

Historical Marker #808 in Pikeville commemorates Pike County being named for a War of 1812 general who was killed in action. Born in New Jersey, Zebulon Pike joined the army in 1794 and fought on the frontier. An explorer, in 1805 he traced the…

Historical Marker # 1123 in Calhoun notes that McLean County was named in honor of a War of 1812 veteran who became a state legislator. Born in North Carolina, Alney McLean moved to Kentucky when he was twenty years old. A surveyor in Muhlenberg…

Historical Marker #886 in Louisa commemorates the naming of Lawrence County after a naval hero of the War of 1812. New Jersey native Captain James Lawrence had been in the U.S. Navy since 1798. He advanced steadily through the ranks, and, on June…

While many Kentucky counties are named for Bluegrass State residents who served in the War of 1812, Jackson County was named after President Andrew Jackson, who was a War of 1812 hero from Tennessee. Today, Historical Marker #1145 in McKee…

Some historians consider the Battle of Tippecanoe, fought in Indiana in November 1811, to be the unofficial beginning of the War of 1812. A casualty from that battle, Kentuckian Joseph Hamilton Daviess, was the namesake for Daviess County. …

Historical Marker #836 in Manchester commemorates the naming of Clay County for Green Clay, a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia, according to one biographer, Green Clay "moved to Madison County in the 1780s and established himself as one of…

Historical Marker #1160 in Marion commemorates the namesake of Crittenden County, who was a War of 1812 veteran. John Jordan Crittenden was born in Woodford County in 1787. Called "one of Kentucky's great statesmen," he was governor of Kentucky,…

Historical Marker #831 commemorates Owen County for being named after a casualty of the Battle of Tippecanoe, a fight that some consider to be the unofficial beginning of the War of 1812. Born in Virginia in 1769, Colonel Abraham Owen moved to…

Historical Marker #845 in Brandenburg commemorates the naming of Meade County after a War of 1812 casualty. James M. Meade of Woodford County saw active service throughout the early nineteenth century. As a member of the 17th United States…

Historical Marker #895 in Clinton commemorates Hickman County being named for a War of 1812 casualty. Paschal Hickman moved to Kentucky in 1784. The family settled in Frankfort, and Paschal's house was supposedly "near the railroad tunnel" there.…

Historical Marker #103 in Frankfort commemorates Leestown, a supply base during the War of 1812. The former site of Leestown, located near Wilkinson Boulevard in Frankfort , was first surveyed in 1773. Although pioneers visited the area, in 1775…

Historical Marker #826 in Wickliffe notes the naming of Ballard County after a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Virginia in 1761, Bland Ballard moved to Kentucky in 1779. He quickly saw military service on the frontier, fighting Native Americans. …

Historical Marker #760 in Scottsville commemorates the naming of Allen County after Colonel John Allen, a War of 1812 casualty. Born in 1771 in Rockbridge County, Virginia, Allen's family moved to Kentucky when he was a child. Allen studied law…

Historical Marker #1342 in Bath County commemorates the site of Olympian Springs, a famous resort that was a War of 1812 camp site. Originally known as Mud Lick Springs, the springs' supposed medicinal properties made it a popular site. In the…

Historical Marker #508 in Georgetown commemorates the Battle of the River Raisin, a War of 1812 battle that led to the deaths of dozens of Kentucky soldiers. On August 15, 1812, Kentucky volunteers rendezvoused in Georgetown before marching into…

Historical Marker #43 in Munfordville commemorates the establishment of Hart County, which is named in honor of a War of 1812 veteran. Nathaniel Hart was born in Maryland and moved to Lexington in 1794. In Kentucky, Hart owned a rope factory and…

Historical Marker #1238 recognizes Shelby County being named for Kentucky's first governor, Isaac Shelby, who was also a War of 1812 veteran. Born in Maryland in 1850, Shelby fought in Lord Dunmore's War and the Revolutionary War. In 1780, he…

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