Historical Marker #978 in Simpson County notes the birthplace of US Representative and Senator Virgil Munday Chapman. Kentucky has produced its fair share of politicians who made a name for themselves on the national stage. Some are better…

Historical Marker #1850 in Simpson County notes the irregular boundary protrusion that occurs on the Kentucky-Tennessee state line where Interstate 65 crosses the border. Looking at almost any map of the United States, it is easy to see the…

Historical Marker #503 in Simpson County notes the unique architecture of Octagon Hall, an eight-sided home built in the mid-nineteenth century. Regardless of era, wealth has always had its privileges. If one has the necessary funds, lifestyle…

Historical Marker #611 in Simpson County notes the location where Tennessee antagonists sometimes met to settle affairs of honor by fighting duels. When a gentleman in the late-eighteenth or early-nineteenth century was publicly humiliated by a…

Historical Marker #2345 in Franklin remembers the Lincoln School, which served as that city’s African American school from 1940-1965. During the “Jim Crow” era, funding for African American schools in southern states often had to come from a…

Historical Marker #1369 in Franklin notes the Goodnight Memorial Library’s founding and long service to the community. One never knows how many lives may be impacted through charitable giving, but almost always, good comes from giving. Such was…

Historical Marker #598 in Simpson County notes the movement of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry while in the area during the Confederate invasion of Kentucky during the summer and fall of 1862. In the summer of 1862, John Hunt Morgan made a raid…

Historical Marker #912 in Franklin notes Simpson County’s namesake, War of 1812 veteran, Captain John Simpson. Simpson, a native of Virginia, came to Kentucky as child with his family. The Simpsons settled in Lincoln County and John attended a…

Historical Marker #2132 in Franklin remembers the birthplace of noted church hymnist Thomas Obadiah Chisholm. T.O. Chisholm was born into a turbulent world on July 29, 1866. The Civil War had ended the year before, but yet random acts of violence…

Historical Marker #1271 in Franklin remembers the service of politician Beverly Leonidas Clarke to the state and nation. Beverly L. Clarke was born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, in 1809. In 1823, he moved with his family to Christian County,…

Historical Marker #2402 in Franklin notes the birthplace of Alexander Majors, a co-founder of the Pony Express. Long before Horace Greely coined the phrase “Go West, young man!” generations had already started looking toward the western…

Historical Marker #1947 in Simpson County remembers native son James Bowie, who died at the Alamo in 1836, and that county’s 1869 redrawn boundary with neighboring Logan County. “Remember the Alamo!” is a phrase that has been passed down…

Historical Marker #741 in Lexington notes the political and military career of John Cabell Breckinridge, who at age thirty-six was the youngest vice president in U.S. history. John C. Breckinridge’s promising future started at an early age. He…

Historical Marker #1110 in Fayette County notes the strange happenstance that made Kentucky native David Rice Atchison the symbolic president of the United States for a day in 1849. David Rice Atchison was born in Fayette County in 1807. After…

Historical Marker #1780 in Fayette County remembers native Kentucky artist Thomas Satterwhite Noble. The study of history occasionally introduces us to individuals that defy convention. These people remind us of the importance of avoiding…

Historical Marker #3 in Lexington commemorates the Morgan House. This house, built by businessman John Wesley Hunt in 1814, has been the home of Hunt’s daughter and her husband Henrietta and Calvin Morgan and their son John Hunt Morgan, and was…

Historical Marker #1888 in Lexington remembers Kentucky portraitist Matthew Harris Jouett, who painted some of Kentucky’s most well known nineteenth century personalities. Matthew Harris Jouett was born in Mercer County in 1788 to Capt. John…

Historical Marker #2238 in Fayette County notes the origins of Maddoxtown, a rural freedman’s community that developed during Reconstruction. For its first seventy plus years slavery was the dominant labor system of Kentucky. And while the Civil…

Historical Marker #1550 in Lexington notes that city’s historic cemetery, which was dedicated in 1850. The mid-nineteenth century witnessed a rise in the construction of garden-style landscaped cemeteries. At that time people’s understanding…

Historical Marker #1163 in Fayette County remembers the significance of hemp to the county’s nineteenth century economy. Early settlers to Kentucky’s Bluegrass Region found that hemp grew well in the area’s nutrient-rich, well-drained soil.…

Historical Marker #17 in Fayette County commemorates Boone’s Station, a community founded by frontiersman Daniel Boone. Settling the Kentucky frontier was a daunting task. The earliest of those hearty souls that voluntarily came across the…

Historical Marker #945 in Lexington notes the Shryock family of architects, whose Kentucky buildings have become iconic reminders of the nineteenth century. Carpenter Mathias Shryock moved to Kentucky from Frederick County, Maryland, in the…

Historical Marker #2201 in Williamsburg remembers Roy Martis Chappell, who was one of the famous Tuskegee Airmen during World War II. Roy Martis Chappell was born on September 27, 1927, in Williamsburg, Kentucky. When he was a young boy, his…

Historical Marker #2374 in Monterey notes Owen County’s first airfield, which was started by Harry Clark Karsner following World War II. Harry Clark Karsner had two passions: flying and sharing his faith. He was able to combine his enthusiasm…

Historical Marker #2251 in Pikeville notes the numerous contributions made to aviation by early airman John Paul Riddle. New inventions bring about opportunities for those willing to think creatively and take chances. When the Wright brothers…

Historical Marker #2300 in Pine Knot remembers Corporal Edward Ward, the first US soldier named to the military’s new aviation program in 1907. To say that the US military was intrigued with the possibilities of the Wright brothers’ invention…

Historical Marker #2344 in Boone County remembers the tragic crash of TWA Flight 128 on November 20, 1967. Trans World Airlines Flight 128 was a domestic flight scheduled to depart Los Angeles, California, and make stops at the Greater Cincinnati…

Historical Marker #1676 in Louisville notes Bowman Field, which is Kentucky’s oldest continuously operated public air field. When one thinks of Louisville airports, Standiford Field quickly comes to mind. But long before Louisville International…

Historical Marker #1222 in Carter County remembers early aviation innovator Matthew Bacon Sellers. Matthew B. Sellers was born into a family of wealth and privilege. His father, also named Matthew, was born in Kentucky and had been a wealthy…

Historical Marker #2270 in Sebree remembers that town's school for African American students, which was built in 1938. Like many towns in immediate post-Civil War America, Sebree's existence was due to the railroads. Established in 1868, and named…