Historical marker #1517 in Whitley County celebrates the Kiwanis Trail that connects Corbin to the Cumberland Falls. The Cumberland Falls is a large waterfall in southeastern Kentucky. On October 21, 1921, the Corbin Kiwanis Club was founded and…

Historic marker #919 in Whitley County commemorates the heroism of Charles H. Gatliff and his wife Christina Gatliff. Captain Charles Gatliff was an early pioneer and settler in Kentucky. On May 28, 1748, he was born in Virginia to James and…

Historic marker #898 in Whitley County notes the early surveying expedition of Dr. Thomas Walker and his companions through southeastern Kentucky. In April 1750, Dr. Thomas Walker and his small group of pioneers ventured into southeastern…

Historic marker #672 in Whitley County commemorates the heroics of Julia Marcum during the Civil War. Born on November 7, 1844, Julia Marcum grew up in Scott County, Tennessee. Her parents were Hiram and Permelia (Huff) Marcum. The family lived…

Historic marker #513 in Whitley County notes the skirmish that occurred in Williamsburg, Kentucky during the Civil War. On July 25, 1863, Confederate Colonel John S. Scott and his men were met by a group from the Union’s 44th Ohio Infantry in a…

Historic marker #2102 in Whitley County recounts the history of Clyde V. and Patricia Bennett Building on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. In 1906, the…

Historic marker #2101 in Whitley County recounts the history of Gillespie Hall on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. Originally built in 1893, Gillespie Hall…

Historic marker #2100 in Whitley County recounts the history of Roburn Hall on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. Roburn Hall was the first building on the…

Historic marker #2084 in Whitley County recounts the history of Mahan Hall on the University of the Cumberlands’ campus. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. In 1906, Cumberland College built Felix…

Historic marker #2002 in Whitley County notes the accomplishments of the Civilian Conservation Corps at Cumberland Falls during the Great Depression. In 1929, the stock market crashed and sent the world into the Great Depression. During these…

Historic marker #1975 notes the history of the Sharpe family and their contributions to Whitley County. The Sharpe family land in Whitley began with John Sharpe. He was a veteran of the War of 1812. After the war, around 1817, Sharpe moved to the…

Historical marker #1837 in Whitley County notes the founding and expansion of the University of the Cumberlands. Prior to 2005, the University of the Cumberlands was called Cumberland College. Cumberland College was originally founded under the…

Historical marker #1801 in Whitley County celebrates the natural phenomenon of the moonbow at the Cumberland Falls. Officially becoming a state park in 1931, the Cumberland Falls State Park sits on the Cumberland River with a large waterfall…

Historic marker #2404 in McCracken County celebrates the history of the Woodland School, a Rosenwald School for African American children. Over two decades, Julius Rosenwald, philanthropist and CEO of Sears Roebuck, worked with Booker T.…

Historical marker #2054 in Knox County notes the founding and history of Union College. Incorporated in October 1879, this small, private college in Knox County is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The college was formed by a group of…

Historical marker #1884 in Knox County commemorates the life of Kentucky Governor Flem D. Sampson. Born on January 25, 1875, Sampson was born in London, Kentucky. Sampson earned his early education from local schools before attending Union College…

Historical marker #1811 in Knox County commemorates the life of Kentucky Governor James D. Black, a native of the county. Born on September 29, 1849, Black grew up in Knox County. His parents were John C. and Clarissa (Jones) Black. James…

Historical Marker #782 in Knox County relates the history of the county’s namesake, Henry Knox. Created in December 1799, Knox County became the forty-first county in the state of Kentucky. The county was created from parts of Lincoln County.…

Historical marker #72 in Knox County notes the pioneering expedition of Dr. Thomas Walker and the site of the first structure built by white men in Kentucky. Before Daniel Boone, Dr. Thomas Walker and a small group of pioneers ventured into…

Historical marker #1950 in McLean County commemorates the life of Charles Hansford, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Around 1730, Charles Hansford’s grandfather immigrated to America and settled in King George County, Virginia. In 1759,…

Historical marker #1812 in McLean County celebrates the life of William Worthington. On May 7, 1761, Worthington was born in Frederick County, Virginia. He married Mary (Meason) Worthington. In 1784, the couple moved from Virginia to Kentucky.…

Historical Marker #1123 in McLean County details the early history and naming of the county and the county’s seat of Calhoun. In 1854, Kentucky established McLean County by combining parts of Daviess, Muhlenberg, and Ohio counties. This county…

Historical marker #892 in McLean County commemorates uniqueness of the Livermore Bridge. The Livermore Bridge does not contain a distinctive architectural structure or a one of a kind design. However, the bridge is like no other bridge in the…

Historical marker #830 in McLean County commemorates the Union camp site of the 35th Kentucky Infantry. On September 26, 1863, the 35th Kentucky (Union) Infantry was organized at Owensboro, Kentucky. Although the regiment was mounted, it was never…

Historic marker #665 in McLean County relates the reconnaissance mission Confederate Colonel Nathan B. Forrest led into the area. In the fall of 1861, Federal troops, led by Brigadier General Thomas L. Crittenden, took position in Calhoun. The…

Historical marker #664 in McLean County commemorates the life and death of James Bethel Gresham, one of the first Americans killed in action during World War I. Gresham was born in McLean County on August 23, 1893. The family lived there until…

Historical marker #523 in McLean County recounts the surprise attack by Confederate forces on Union troops near Sacramento, Kentucky. The Battle of Sacramento was Confederate Colonel (later general) Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first significant…

Historical Marker #2313 notes the legacy and location of Lexington's Historic Distillery District. Shortly after the end of the Civil War, the Headley and Farra Company established a distillery in Lexington on Old Frankfort Pike, now called…

Historical markers #1986 and #1987 note the location and significance of the Labrot and Graham Distillery in Versailles, Kentucky. The Labrot and Graham distillery holds the distinction of being one of the oldest working distilleries in Kentucky. …

Historical Marker #2105 notes the creation of the Brown-Forman Company in Louisville, Kentucky, and one of the company's founders, George Garvin Brown. Brown was born in Munfordville, Kentucky, on September 2, 1846. He moved to Louisville in…