Historical Marker #1734 in Scott County makes note of Ward Hall. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places, Ward Hall is a stately structure located one mile east of Georgetown. Colonel Robert Johnson, a member of the first Constitutional…

Historical Marker #1861 in Scott County remembers General Basil W. Duke, best known for his service to the Confederacy during the Civil War, but also his significant political and literary contributions to Kentucky following the conflict. Duke was…

Historical Marker #718 in Scott County marks Cardome, the home of Governor James F. Robinson, who led the commonwealth through one of the most difficult periods in its history. Robinson was a true Renaissance man who farmed, practiced law, and served…

Historical Marker #610 memorializes George W. Johnson, the first Confederate governor of Kentucky, at his home in Scott County. Born in 1811 in Scott County, Johnson practiced law in Georgetown after receiving his degree from Transylvania…

Located in Prestonsburg, Kentucky, Historical Marker #2018 commemorates the Samuel May House. Built in 1817, the house was the hub of a 350-acre farm that served as a recruiting and supply post for the Confederate Army during the Civil War. The…

Historical Marker #2388 in Danville notes the community's African American contributions to the Union army during the Civil War. In many instances, slaves and free men of color who tried to join the Union army faced substantial danger. The…

Historical Marker #2226 in Frankfort commemorates the only monument in the state that honors the nearly 25,000 African American Kentuckians who served in the United States Colored Troops during the American Civil War. Although Kentucky remained…

Historical Marker #1481 in Mercer County recognizes the Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill. The Society of Believers, more commonly known as the Shakers, immigrated to America from England in 1774 to avoid religious persecution. By the early…

Historical Marker #215 in Vanceburg notes the Union monument placed there in 1884 by the citizens of Lewis County. Kentucky, like the United States, was divided during the Civil War. Although the commonwealth sent more than two-thirds of its…

Historical Marker #57 in Todd County marks the birthplace of Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis. Both Davis and his Union counterpart, President Abraham Lincoln, were born in Kentucky. Born on June 3, 1808, near the Fairview community of…

Historical Marker #147 in Calloway County commemorates Fort Heiman, a Confederate fort erected in 1861. Fort Heiman is the least well known of three Confederate forts that were built to guard the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers. Constructed in…

Historical Marker #2107 in Lyon County commemorates Andrew Jackson Smith, an African American soldier who won the Medal of Honor for heroism in the Civil War. Smith, the son of an enslaved African American and her white owner, was born in Lyon…

Historical Marker # 1965 in Jessamine County notes the location of the Camp Nelson refugee camp, which housed the families of hundreds of African American soldiers. Camp Nelson was established in 1863 as a recruiting station and quartermaster…

Historical Marker #2361 in McCracken County notes the Civil War service of the 8th United States Colored Heavy Artillery. During the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln believed that Kentucky-a loyal, slaveholding border state-was critical to the…

Historical Marker #780 marks the birthplace of Champ Ferguson, a Civil War guerrilla who was hanged by Union authorities after the Civil War. Ferguson was born in Clinton County, Kentucky, in 1821. By the time the Civil War erupted, he had…

Historical Marker #1127 in Bowling Green commemorates Riverview at Hobson Grove, which was occupied by Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Built on high ground overlooking the Barren River, Riverview at Hobson Grove was the home of wealthy…

Historical Marker #521 in Bell County notes the importance of the Cumberland Gap during the American Civil War. Cumberland Gap is located on the route of the famous old "Wilderness Road," one of the entry points into Kentucky during the pioneer…

Historical Marker #1413 in Bullitt County commemorates Confederate General John Hunt Morgan's raid into Ohio. Morgan's "Great Raid" in the summer of 1863 lasted more than forty-five days and covered nearly one thousand miles. The raid met with…

Historical Marker #637 in Carter County notes the route of retreat north from Cumberland Gap made by Union General George W. Morgan's Union force during the fall of 1862. That September, Confederate troops led by General Carter L. Stevenson neared…

Historical Marker 1324 in Bullitt County notes that General William T. Sherman brought a Union force to Lebanon Junction in September 1861 to counter the Confederate capture of Bowling Green. The end of Kentucky's neutrally in September 1861…

Historical Marker #1606, located at the Boyle County Courthouse in Danville, commemorates John Marshall Harlan, a Boyle County native, Civil War veteran, and U.S. Supreme Court justice. Born a few miles west of Danville in 1833, Harlan's family…

Historical Marker #1442 notes that Trinity Episcopal Church is "one of the oldest church buildings in Danville." Constructed in 1830 by resident Robert Russel Jr., the early members of the church included Dr. Ephraim McDowell, who performed the…

Historical Marker #24 commemorates Danville native Theodore O'Hara, a Civil War veteran and poet who wrote the famous poem "The Bivouac of the Dead." Today, O'Hara's poem is inscribed on monuments across the nation, including the gates of Arlington…

Historical Marker #2005 in Danville commemorates Jacobs Hall, a structure at the Kentucky School for the Deaf (KSD). The marker also recognizes the namesake of the building, John A. Jacobs, who was "KSD's first trained teacher, principal, [and]…

Historical Marker #754 commemorates the Danville Presbyterian Church, which was used as a hospital following the Battle of Perryville. When the Reverend David Rice traveled through pioneer Kentucky, he saw a need for churches. "I found scarcely…

Historical marker #756, located at the Boyle County Courthouse in Danville, commemorates the occupation of the structure as a field hospital during the Civil War. When the Battle of Perryville was fought ten miles from Danville on October 8,…

Historical Marker #923 in Danville commemorates Centre College, an institution of higher learning that the Washington Post has called "one of the premier intellectual gathering points in its region." Founded in 1819 by former governor Isaac…

The summer before Abraham Lincoln was elected president, he wrote a response to Samuel Haycraft, who had asked Lincoln to return to Kentucky to visit his boyhood home. Although few Kentuckians supported Lincoln's bid for the presidency, the future…

Historical Marker #2312 commemorates two battles that John Hunt Morgan fought in Cynthiana during the Civil War. In the summer of 1862, Confederate raider John Hunt Morgan launched his first major raid into Kentucky. The famed "Thunderbolt of the…

Historical Marker #1919 commemorates the Battle of Camp Wildcat, which was fought near London, Kentucky, in October 1861. During the early stages of the Civil War, both sides actively recruited Kentucky's men of military age. Of particular…