Historical Marker #706 in Taylor County notes the Battle of Tebbs Bend. There, on July 4, 1863, Confederate raider John Hunt Morgan's command ran into a much smaller Federal force on the Green River and was soundly defeated. This engagement set an…

Historical Marker #1917 in Kenton County commemorates Fort Wright, a defensive position that was named in honor of Union General Horatio G. Wright. In August and September 1862, Confederate generals Edmund Kirby Smith and Braxton Bragg invaded…

Historical Marker #604 in Adair County commemorates Union Colonel Frank Wolford, a Columbia native who had a controversial military career. Wolford was a vocal opponent of President Abraham Lincoln's policies in Kentucky during the Civil War,…

Historical Marker #1480 in Lexington notes the life of Dr. Robert Peter, whose daughter, Frances, was a unique chronicler of Civil War Lexington. Her diary, A Union Woman in Civil War Kentucky, was published by the University Press of Kentucky. A…

Historical Marker #816 in Robertson County commemorates the naming of that county after George Robertson, a prominent judge who tangled with Abraham Lincoln about slavery during the Civil War. Born in Mercer County in 1780, Robertson was a lawyer,…

Historical Marker #2277 notes Lexington's First Presbyterian Church and one nineteenth century pastor, the Reverend Robert J. Breckinridge. During the Civil War, Kentucky Presbyterian minister Robert J. Breckinridge was an important advisor to…

Historical Marker #2234 in Louisville's Cave Hill Cemetery commemorates Kentucky Governor Thomas E. Bramlette, a Union veteran of the Civil War. Elected in 1863 after an active Civil War career as a Union colonel, Bramlette frequently tangled with…

Historical Marker #786 in Magoffin County commemorates the county being named for Beriah Magoffin, one of Kentucky's Civil War governors. A Harrodsburg lawyer, Magoffin became governor of Kentucky on the eve of the Civil War. Although he…

Historical Marker #603 notes two Union generals who lived in Greensburg, William Ward and Edward Hobson. Born in Virginia, Ward moved to Kentucky where he became a prominent attorney, officer in the Mexican War, legislator, and congressman. When…

Historical Marker #2283 in Shelby County commemorates the massacre of members of the 5th United States Colored Cavalry (USCC) near Simpsonville. On January 25, 1865, Company E of the 5th USCC was transporting a herd of 900 cattle to Louisville. …

Two historical markers--#1515 and #2222---commemorate Camp Nelson in Jessamine County, where most of the state's African American Union soldiers were recruited. Established near Nicholasville in 1863, Camp Nelson was named for Union General…

Historical Marker #1160 in Marion commemorates the namesake of Crittenden County. John Jordan Crittenden was born in Woodford County in 1787. Called "one of Kentucky's great statesmen," he was governor of Kentucky, attorney general under three…

Historical Marker #524 in Monroe County notes when John Hunt Morgan struck Tompkinsville. In July 1862, Morgan raided Kentucky for the first time to disrupt Union lines of communication. On July 9, his two regiments hit Tompkinsville, where they…

Historical Marker #862 in Bath County marks the birthplace of Confederate General John Bell Hood. Born in Owingsville in 1831, Hood graduated from West Point and served on the Texas frontier. When the Civil War erupted, he joined the Confederacy…

Historical Marker #552 in Breckinridge County commemorates Joseph Holt, the Unionist judge advocate general who prosecuted the Lincoln assassination conspirators. Born in Breckinridge County in 1807, Holt practiced law in Kentucky and Missouri. A…

Historical Marker #518 describes the Civil War in Barbourville in Knox County. At the beginning of the Civil War, Unionists established Camp Andy Johnson near Barbourville. Kentuckians and East Tennesseans were recruited there, and, on September…

Historical marker #562 in Simpson County notes the burial location of Marcellus Jerome Clarke--known to history as "Sue Mundy"--one of Kentucky's most infamous pro-Confederate guerrillas. Born near Franklin, Clarke joined the Confederate army with…

Historical Marker #2247 in Greenup County commemorates Camp Swigert, a Union recruiting camp. In December 1861, the 22nd Kentucky Union Infantry Regiment organized at this camp. Recruits came from Louisville and Greenup, Franklin, Carter, Lewis,…

Historical Marker #528 at Columbus-Belmont State Park in Hickman County discusses Columbus's role during the Civil War. In early September 1861, Confederate General Leonidas Polk took Columbus. An important strategic location because of the…

Historical Marker #770 in Butler County notes the birthplace of Confederate soldier Thomas Henry Hines. Called the "most dangerous man of [the] Confederacy," Hines was born near Woodbury on October 9, 1838. A professor at the Masonic University…

Historical Marker #863 in Pulaski County commemorates the Battle of Mill Springs. Fought on January 19, 1862, the battle was an early Union victory that helped break a Confederate defensive line that spanned across southern Kentucky. With…

Historical Marker #531 in Clay County commemorates the Goose Creek Salt Works, which were destroyed by Union troops during the Civil War. Salt was a precious commodity to both armies. Therefore, these works, owned by Union Colonel T. T. Garrard,…

Historical Marker #963 in Paducah marks the death of Confederate Colonel A. P. Thompson, who was killed while attacking his hometown. Born in Green County on March 3, 1829, Thompson was a Paducah lawyer who served as McCracken County's…

Historical Marker #1846 in Richmond discusses James B. McCreary, a Confederate veteran who was twice governor of Kentucky. Born in Madison County in 1838, McCreary joined the Confederacy despite opposition from his family. He wrote, "I stand…

Historical Marker #523 commemorates the Battle of Sacramento in McLean County. On December 28, 1861, nearly 300 Confederate cavalry led by Nathan Bedford Forrest attacked about 200 Union horsemen near Sacramento. The battle was Forrest's first…

Historical Marker #1758 in Kenton County commemorates Union General Ormsby Mitchel, the namesake of Fort Mitchell, Kentucky. During the Civil War, several dozen earthen fortifications were constructed to protect Cincinnati and northern Kentucky. …

Historical Marker #1750 commemorates Camp Dick Robinson, a Garrard County recruiting camp that was instrumental in keeping Kentucky in the Union. Established on the farm of Richard Robinson in August 1861 by Union officer and Maysville native…

Historical Marker #1218 commemorates Boyle County for being named after Judge John Boyle, a state representative, congressman, and prominent judge. Boyle's son--Jeremiah Tilford Boyle--became Union military commander of Kentucky for much of the…

Historical Marker #534 in Louisville notes the birthplace of Robert Anderson, the commander of Ft. Sumter and the "first Union hero of [the] Civil War." Born in 1805 at "Soldiers Retreat" in Jefferson County, Anderson was a West Point…

Historical Marker #501 commemorates the Battle of Augusta, Kentucky. Although smaller than most battles fought that year, this action changed the course of a major military campaign. When Confederate armies invaded Kentucky in 1862, Confederate…