Historical Marker #2229 in Frankfort commemorates Kentucky's Executive Mansion, the state’s second governor's residence. In 1911, Governor Augustus E. Wilson recommended that a new governor's mansion be built near the new capitol building in…

Historical Marker #2299 honors Captain Daniel Weisiger III (1763-1829), a farmer and merchant who was one of Frankfort's forefathers. Born in Virginia, Daniel served with General George Roger Clark fighting Native Americans before settling in…

Historical Marker #2057 commemorates Good Shepherd Catholic Church in Frankfort. The first Mass in Frankfort was celebrated by Father Stephen Theodore Badin in 1794. Father Badin, the first priest ordained in the United States, worked as a…

Historical Marker #2025 commemorates the site of Winnie A. Scott Hospital, which was located at 228 East Second Street in the South Frankfort neighborhood. South Frankfort’s northeastern section has historically had a large African American…

Historical Marker #2031 commemorates Melodye Park, a former Frankfort destination. Frankfort's first public park, it was located on the west bank of the Kentucky River in South Frankfort. Louis Horwitz developed Melodye Park with his own…

Historical Marker #2428 commemorates the history of the O.F.C.-Stagg Distillery in Franklin County. Perhaps the most remarkable man to enter the whiskey industry during the post-Civil War years was Colonel Edmund Haynes Taylor, Jr. Born in…

Historical Marker #1743 in Frankfort commemorates the Vest-Lindsey House, which was the home of notable nineteenth century personalities George Graham Vest, Thomas Noble Lindsey, and Daniel W. Lindsey. Much like the John J. Crittenden House only a…

Historical Marker #1779 notes the location of the Kentucky state capitol building in south Frankfort. The new building replaced the previous one on Broadway, which had been used since 1830. Kentucky's official capitol buildings have always been…

Historical Marker #69 in Frankfort remembers the Lexington and Ohio Railroad, which was the first railroad in Kentucky. The Lexington and Ohio (L&O) Railroad received a charter from the Kentucky legislature in 1830. The intent of those associated…

Historical Marker #1752 in Frankfort notes the 1886 founding of this traditionally African American institution of higher learning. Before 1887, African American students had little choice in their college education if they wanted to stay in…

Historical Marker #1444 in Frankfort notes the location of Glen Willis, the former residence of Willis Atwell Lee and Humphrey Marshall. Leestown, just about a mile north of present-day Frankfort, was the first community established in Franklin…

Historical Marker #1796 in Frankfort notes the location of the Garrard-Crittenden House, the former home of relatives of governors John J. Crittenden and James Garrard. The home is also sometimes called the Hoge House, named after the home's last…

Historical Marker #1774 in Frankfort notes how that city became the seat of Kentucky's government. Frankfort's history pre-dates its role as the state's capital. Located in an "S" curve of the Kentucky River, the land that became Frankfort was…

Historical Marker #2167 in Frankfort notes the trailblazing political career of Emma Guy Cromwell, Kentucky's first female secretary of state. In an era when politics was viewed as a forum unfit for women, a few brave souls paved the way for…

Historical Marker #1154 in Frankfort notes the home of Kentucky statesman John Jordan Crittenden. John J. Crittenden was one of Kentucky's most accomplished and well respected politicians of the nineteenth century. His reputation came, in part,…

Historical Marker # 2236 in Frankfort notes the location of philanthropist Emily Harvie Thomas Tubman's summer home. Emily Harvie Thomas Tubman lived an extraordinary life for a nineteenth century woman. Born in 1794 in Hanover County, Virginia,…

Historical Marker #1495 in Frankfort commemorates St. John African Methodist Episcopal Church, one of the earliest African American congregations in Frankfort. The African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church was founded in Philadelphia by Richard…

Historical Marker #1999 near Frankfort notes where Buena Vista, the summer home of the Robert Todd family, once stood. Among others, the first families of Kentucky include the Clays, the Breckinridges, the Logans, and the Todds. Brothers John,…

Historical Marker #1799 notes the location of Amos Kendall's home when he lived in Frankfort. Kendall was a noted Frankfort newspaper editor who became postmaster general in Andrew Jackson's administration. Kendall was born in Massachusetts in…

Historical Marker #504 in Frankfort notes the location where four Confederate men were executed in 1864, as an act of retaliation for the murder of a local Unionist by guerrillas. In the border state of Kentucky, allegiances were sometimes fluid…

Historical Marker #2416 in Frankfort commemorates the June 1864 Confederate attacks on Frankfort by elements of John Hunt Morgan's cavalry. In the fall of 1862, Frankfort had been captured by the Confederates—the only Union state capital to fall…