Historical Marker #1854 in Kenton County remembers Frank Duvenek, a world renowned artist and teacher. Duveneck was born in Covington on October 9, 1848, to German parents Bernard and Katherine Decker. Frank's father died while Frank was an…

Historical Marker #1709 in Kenton County remembers William Goebel, a lawyer and politician who began his career in Covington. Goebel was born in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, on January 4, 1856. Within a decade, after his father returned from service in…

Historical Marker #1601 in Kenton County commemorates the Roebling Suspension Bridge, the first bridge to span the Ohio River. Opened to traffic on January 1, 1867, at the time the bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world. The cost of…

Historical Marker #1594 in Kenton County marks the home of Jesse and Hannah Grant, the parents of President Ulysses S. Grant. The Grant family lived there from 1859 to 1873. Jesse Root Grant married Hannah Simpson on June 24, 1821, in Clermont…

Historical Marker #1488 in Kenton County remembers noted historian Richard Henry Collins. Collins was born on May 4, 1824, in Maysville, Kentucky, to Lewis and Eleanor Collins. His father, a judge and journalist, had also authored the "most…

Historical Marker #1460 in Kenton County commemorates the Mother of God Catholic Church in Covington as being the "Cradle of the Arts." The church, which was the second Catholic church to be erected in Covington, was the mother-parish to several…

Historical Marker #1168 commemorates the namesake of Kenton County, General Simon Kenton, who was an explorer and pioneer of early Kentucky. Born in Virginia on April 3, 1755, Kenton received no formal schooling as a boy, causing him to remain…

Historical Marker #50 in Kenton County marks the boyhood home of Daniel Carter Beard, an early leader of the Boy Scouts of America. Although Beard was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 21, 1850, he soon moved to nearby Covington, Kentucky. After…