Historical Marker #697 in Jackson County notes the location of part of the Warrior's Path, a Native American route used by various warring tribes and factions to travel north and south. Long before white hunters and explorers entered into what…

Historical Marker #1042 in Hopkinsville remembers the location where Cherokee Indians camped in 1838 on their long route to lands established for their relocation in Indian Territory. The Indian Removal Act is remembered today as one of America's…

Historical Marker #31 in Greenup County notes the location of Shannoah, a Shawnee Indian village that existed on the south bank of the Ohio River. The area has also been known as Lower Shawneetown. Although Shannoah was an eighteenth century…

Historical Marker #1675 in Livingston County notes the natural geological formation where hundreds of Cherokees camped for two weeks waiting to cross the Ohio River on their forced removal to Indian Territory in 1839. Cherokees traveling overland…

Historical Marker #2290 in Mount Sterling notes the location of an ancient Native American burial mound that was leveled in 1845. Mount Sterling, founded around 1792, was originally known as Little Mountain Town. It developed this name from the…

Historical Marker #1614 in Bracken County notes the location where, in 1793, Simon Kenton and a party of settlers crossed the Ohio River to attack a group of Native Americans returning from a raid into central Kentucky. By the 1770s, most Native…

Historical Marker #1274 in Clark County notes the location of Eskippakithiki, a Shawnee village that was inhabited during the eighteenth century. While Kentucky was largely an area in which different Native American tribes warred and hunted, there…

Historical Marker #921 in Ashland's Central Park notes the location of a series of six ancient Native American mounds. The Indian mounds constructed in what became Kentucky are believed to have been built by the Adena Culture, a prehistoric people…

Historical Marker #135 in Scott County notes the location of the Choctaw Indian Academy. Established in 1818, it was later sponsored by future U.S. Vice-President Richard M. Johnson. At the end of the eighteenth and early-nineteenth century, as…

Historical Marker # 908 in Clay County remembers Chief Red Bird, a Cherokee leader and the namesake of the Red Bird River, a tributary of the Kentucky River. The late eighteenth century was a period of conflict between the increasing numbers of…

Historical Marker #21 in Fayette County commemorates Bryan's Station, a frontier fort that came under a combined Native American, Tory, and Canadian Ranger attack in 1782. The settlements in what became Kentucky found themselves in an unenviable…

Historical Marker #953 in Falmouth (Pendleton County) notes British Colonel Henry Byrd's strike against Kentucky settlements in the summer of 1780. The problems that the British experienced with the American colonists in the 1760s and 1770s…

Historical Marker #18 in Robertson County commemorates the Battle of Blue Licks, which is sometimes called the last battle of the Revolutionary War. In August 1782, a combined British, Canadian, and Native American force made a foray from southern…