Historical Marker #2445 commemorates Evan Williams (1755 – 1810), an early Kentucky whiskey distiller in Jefferson County. A native of Wales, Williams came to Kentucky around 1780. He settled in Louisville, which had been established two years…

Historical Marker #2398 in Glasgow recognizes the first African American woman to earn a pilot’s license in the United States. Willa Brown Chappell, a Glasgow native, was influential in breaking through racial barriers in the aviation field…

Historical Marker #2406 commemorates Garden Hall, an elegant Georgian mansion located on Wapping Street in Frankfort. The home was built by Graham Vreeland, who was the founder, editor, and publisher of the "Frankfort State Journal." In October…

Historical marker #2394 in Boone County commemorates a daring prison escape made by Confederate cavalryman John Hunt Morgan. In November 1863, Morgan escaped from the Ohio State Penitentiary and crossed into Boone County, Kentucky. On July 31,…

Marker #2393 in Constance, Kentucky, commemorates the Anderson Ferry and the 1937 Flood in Boone County. On March 3, 1817, a ferry bond was issued to George Anderson to operate a ferry across the Ohio River. That year, Anderson bought the ferry…

Historical Marker #2385 in Louisville commemorates St. Frances of Rome Catholic Church, named for Francesca Romana who inspired women to pray, care for the sick, and feed the hungry. Frances was born in Rome to a noble family in 1384 and died in…

Historical Marker #2396 commemorates the Shelby Park Neighborhood, one of the areas in Louisville that was originally populated by German immigrants. This area of the city received one of the later waves of immigrants. In 1847, the upper third of…

Historical Marker #2383 in Marshall County commemorates Shelby McCallum, a businessman and public servant. Born in Jackson, Tennessee, on January 23, 1917, McCallum was raised in the nearby town of Humboldt. He graduated from Humboldt High School…

Historical Marker #2389 in Jefferson County commemorates the Naval Ordnance Plant and Naval Ordnance Station, called the "Gunsmiths to the Navy," which produced ordnance for the U.S. Navy during and after World War II. In 1940, the Department of…

Historical Marker #2384 commemorates the three Medal of Honor winners who were natives of Daviess County. John J. Given was born in Daviess County in 1840. He entered the U.S. Army in Cincinnati, Ohio, and fought in the Indian Campaigns…

Historical Marker #2390 in Campbell County commemorates Mary Boone Bryan, the wife of William Bryan and a sister of Daniel Boone. Mary was born in Pennsylvania and was the seventh child of Squire and Sarah M. Boone. She was about fourteen years…

Historical Marker #2391 in Boyle County commemorates the site of the Kirkland Home, which was one of the homes used by soldiers during the aftermath of the Battle of Perryville. Charles King Kirkland and Caroline Purdom Kirkland lived between the…

Historical Marker #2380 in Boone County commemorates the Crash of TWA Flight 694, which crashed two minutes after takeoff. Trans World Airlines Flight 694 departed Greater Cincinnati Airport en route to Cleveland, Ohio, at 9:02 a.m. on January 12,…

Historical Marker #2379 commemorates the life of Bishop John Monroe Moore, an important religious leader from Butler County. Moore was born on a farm near Morgantown on January 27, 1867. He began school at age seven and, at age seventeen,…

Historical Marker #2382 commemorates Bettie Taylor Phillips, one of Union County's most colorful citizens from the Civil War period. Bettie Taylor was born in Morganfield on April 6, 1830. In 1847, she married William S. Phillips of Uniontown.…