Historical Marker #2061 in Frankfort notes the location of barracks built by the federal government to house soldiers serving in Reconstruction era Kentucky. The immediate post-Civil War period in Kentucky has often been referred to by historians…

Historical Marker #1990 in Louisville notes the historical significance of the interstate slave trade to Kentucky’s economy before the Civil War. During the antebellum era, Kentucky, like the other border and upper-South states, served as an…

Historical Marker #2119 in Louisville notes the historical significance of York, William Clark’s slave, who was an active participant in the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition to the Pacific Northwest. One of many sad realities of slavery is that…

Historical Marker #2249 in Nelson County notes the location of free man of color Ham Brown’s residence, which was formerly a slave quarters. Ham Brown appears in the historical record on several occasions. He and his wife, Adeline, are listed…

Historical Marker #606 in Elizabethtown notes the service of Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer and his men in Kentucky during the Reconstruction era. During the early 1870s, racial violence was so prevalent in Kentucky that the federal government…

Historical Marker #2094 in Jefferson County notes the location of Forest Home Cemetery, one of the oldest African American cemeteries in Kentucky. Forrest Home Cemetery would not exist were it not for one of the individuals buried there: Eliza…

Historical Marker #2027 in Woodford County notes the historical significance of Edward Dudley Brown, an African American jockey, horse owner, and trainer. Brown, better known as Brown Dick—nicknamed after a fast horse of that era —was born…

Historical Marker #124 in Mason County notes the birthplace of Charles Young, an early African American graduate of the United States Military Academy and the first black colonel in the U.S. Army. Young was born into slavery in 1864, just as the…

Historical Marker #2268 in Lincoln County notes the location of Boneyville, an "emancipation" or "free town" formed in the years immediately following the Civil War. Numerous small, rural, African American communities sprang up during the…

Historical Marker #2110 in Lexington notes the location of African American Cemetery #2, which was established in 1869. After the Civil War, Kentucky African Americans looked to make good on the social, political, and economic changes produced by…