Historical marker #2545 commemorates the legal case Commonwealth of Kentucky v. Jeffery Wasson and the successful challenge to Kentucky's discriminatory anti-sodomy statute.Lexington police arrested Jeffery Wasson during the fall of 1985 as part of…

Historical marker #2539 stands outside of one of the oldest LGBTQ gathering spaces in the United States.As early as 1939, LGBTQ Kentuckians gathered discreetly at 224 East Main St. in Lexington. While not an explicitly LGBTQ space at this point, the…

Historical marker #2535 celebrates the marriage of legendary country musicians Johnny Cash and June Carter in Franklin, Kentucky on March 1, 1968. It also commemorates the wedding of musicans Kitty Wells and Johnnie Wright in 1937.Franklin's location…

Historical marker #2550 celebrates the history of the Northern Kentucky Heritage League.The Northern Kentucky Heritage League (NKHL) began in 1967 as a fine arts organization dedicated to promoting the heritage, culture and arts of the region.…

Historical marker #2543 celebrates the history of "Suffolk," an early settlement in what became Butler County. The initial white settlement in this area was called "Bluff" and likely drew its name from a physical feature, a bluff overlooking the…

Historical marker #2548 celebrates the history of J.W. Million School and educator Lester G. Mimms of Earlington.Black education in Earlington received a boost during the late nineteenth century with the establishment of the Earlington Colored School…

Historical marker #2549 commemorates the life of John Jacob Niles and his family at Boot Hill Farm on Boone Creek along the Fayette and Clark County line. John Jacob Niles was born into a musical family in Louisville in 1892. There were many…

Historical Marker #2538 celebrates the history of the original Paul Laurence Dunbar High School in Lexington. During the era of segregated education in Kentucky, Paul Laurence Dunbar High School became one of the leading academic institutions for…

Historical marker #2552 commemorates jockey Roscoe Goose outside of his former house near Churchill Downs. Roscoe Goose, often known as the "Golden Goose," had an illustrious racing career that included one of the most surprising victories in…

Historical marker #2547 commemorates the final resting places of James H. and Floyd McCoy in the Catlettsburg Cemetery. These sons of Randall and Sarah McCoy appeared at pivotal moments of both the Hatfield-McCoy fued and the final peace between the…

Historical marker #2532 commemorates the history and people of Eastern Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in Louisville. It was first documented as a burial ground in the 1840s before it was formally incorporated by the Methodist Episcopal Church…

Historical Marker #2534 celebrates the Red Cross Hospital that treated black Kentuckians at 1436 South Shelby St. in Louisville from 1899 to 1976.The hopsital got its start because of medical segregation which prevented black doctors from treating…

Historical marker #2541 celebrates the life and contributions of Samuel Cox, 1756-1832. Cox was an early resident in what became Whitley County and became a leading promoter of the settlement of Williamsburg. Much of the current town is located on…

Historical marker #2544 commemorates one of the first-established and longest-running farms in Bourbon County and the whole of the Commonwealth, Townsend Springs Farm. In 1775, John Townsend traveled with Captain John Hinkston down the Ohio River…

Historical marker #2551 commemorates the Wisertown settlement that once existed along St. Andrew's Church Road in southwestern Jefferson County. When John Wiser moved to the area in 1817, he was one of the early white settlers to make their homes in…

Kentucky Historical Marker #2520 celebrates the history of black barber shops in Frankfort, focusing particularly on the contributions that Mr. Robert Lee Taylor made to the local community. The barber shop that eventually became Mr. Taylor's started…

Historical marker #2531 in Clark County notes Daniel Boone's career as a surveyor and the role he played in establishing the Bush settlement during the eighteenth century. Surveying land on the Kentucky frontier was a difficult, dirty, and dangerous…

Marker #2032 recounts some of the history of the Berrytown Cemetery in Jefferson County. The cemetery functioned as a central cultural institution for the Berrytown community after it was established in the late nineteenth century. The United…

Marker #1982 celebrates the history of the Berrytown community in Jefferson County. What became known as Berrytown started when the formerly enslaved Alfred Berry purchased five acres in eastern Jefferson County from Samuel L. Nock in 1874. Nock was…

Historical marker #1985 notes the history of the Smoketown community of Jefferson County. What became known as "Smoketown" in Louisville got its start in the immediate post-Civil War era as thousands of black Kentuckians moved to Louisville in search…

Historical marker #1988 celebrated the communities of Petersburg and Newburg in Jefferson County. Unfortuantely, the marker is no longer standing.  Before this area became Petersburg or Newburg, it was known as Wet Woods due to the swampy prevailing…

Historical marker #2052 celebrates the community of Jonesville in Warren County. For nearly a century following Emancipation, from the 1860s through the 1950s, Jonesville was home to a vibrant black community. Founded by formerly enslaved men and…

Griffytown’s history stretches back to the late nineteenth century when Dan Griffith, a freedman, moved a log cabin to Old Harrod's Creek Road.  According to local oral tradition, the formerly-enslaved Daniel Griffith purchased a wooden home from…

Historical marker #2267 celebrates the history of the Zion Hill community and Zion Hill School in Scott County. The village of Zion Hill dates back to the antebellum era, prior to Emancipation and the end of slavery in Kentucky. The community was…

Historical marker #1938 commemorates the New Zion community in Scott County. The roots of the African American community of New Zion stretch back to 1872 when two formerly enslaved men bought land on which to make their homes. Ultimately, the 23…

Historical marker #2348 commemorates the long and varied history of the structure at 215 Walnut Street in Midway. Constructed in 1872, the building originally served as the home of the Colored Baptist Church, which later changed to Pilgrim…

Historical marker #2074 in Jefferson County commemorates the history of the orignal African American section of Parkland. The boundaries of the community known as “Little Africa” in Jefferson County vary depending on the source and the era being…

“You'd better watch out. You'd better not cry. You’d better not pout. I’m telling you way—Santa Claus is coming to town.” This holiday warning, delivered to children annually from November to December 25, calls to mind the North Pole, chimneys across…