Historical Marker #2489 commemorates the life of Colonel John Dils, Jr. John Dils, Jr. was one of the most successful men in antebellum Pike County. Upon arriving in the region from northern Virginia around 1840, Dils spent some time as a…

Historical maker #2526 commemorates the original home of St. Michael's Parish, the third Catholic parish established in the state of Kentucky. St. Michael's, located in Fairfield in Nelson County, served as an incubator for Catholicism in the state.…

Historical marker #2521 commemorates the life of Willis A. "Mose" Lee Jr. Lee was an Owen County native whose accomplishments had largely faded from public memory until a group of middle schoolers restored the Vice Admiral to a prominent place in the…

Historical Marker #1728 marks Dils Cemetery in Pikeville. Dils Cemetery is the resting place of Randolph and Sarah McCoy, as well as their daughter, Roseanna, son, Sam, and Sam’s wife, Martha.  Each of these McCoys had their lives shaped by the…

Historical Marker #1913 commemorates one of the last incidents in the Hatfield-McCoy feud. Ellison Mounts, a poor twenty-five-year-old who took part in the raid of the McCoy’s home in 1888, was found guilty of the murder of Alifair McCoy (event…

Historical Marker #1866 marks the Pike County Courthouse and Jail, where members of the Hatfield family were tried and found guilty of the murders of Tolbert, Randolph, Jr., Pharmer, Alifair, and Calvin McCoy. In September 1889, the bloody results of…

Marker #2145 marks Randolph and Sarah McCoy’s home in Pikeville, where they moved after their Blackberry Creek home was burned in 1888 (covered on marker #2062).  Perry Cline, a Pikeville lawyer and distant relative of the McCoys who had a past…

Historical Marker #2434 is dedicated to Frank and Nancy McCoy Phillips. “Bad” Frank Phillips was appointed by the Kentucky governor to arrest members of the Hatfield family. Phillip’s appointment followed the resumption of violence in the…

Historical Marker #2067 marks the McCoy Cemetery where three of Randolph McCoy’s sons—Tolbert, Pharmer, and Randolph, Jr. are buried. All three brothers, as well as Alifair and Calvin McCoy were killed by Hatfields in various incidents. Tolbert,…

Historical Marker #2062 is at the site of the original Randolph McCoy home on Blackberry Creek, which was burned on January 1, 1888, during a Hatfield raid. Randolph and his wife Sarah subsequently moved to Pikeville where he operated a ferry. The…

Historical Marker #2047 marks the site of the notorious pawpaw tree incident in 1882.   The violence of the pawpaw tree incident grew from a spark ignited by an election-day altercation between Tolbert McCoy, a son of Randolph “Old Ranel” McCoy,…

Historical Marker #2176 tells the story of the doomed love affair between Roseanna McCoy, Randolph’s daughter, and Johnse Hatfield, son of “Devil Anse” and their daughter Sarah Elizabeth (Sally) McCoy who died only a few months after her…

Historical Marker #2066 commemorates the site of the 1878 Hog Trial and the 1882 election fight (covered in Marker #2047). In the fall of 1878, William “Devil Anse” Hatfield’s cousin, Floyd Hatfield drove his hogs into pens for fattening on the…

Historical Marker #2068 marks the location where Asa Harmon McCoy was shot by the Logan Wildcats on January 7, 1865. The younger brother of McCoy patriarch Randolph “Old Ranel” McCoy, Harmon was a Union veteran, who mustered out of service on…

Historical Marker #904 commemorates the volunteers of Breathitt County during World War I. Better known as home to feuding Appalachians, Breathitt County gained national prominence by filling their quota of troops without relying on the draft. This…

Historical Marker #2126 commemorates Camp Zachary Taylor, one of sixteen national army training camps created during World War I. The city of Louisville won the contest to host the camp over competition from other regional centers, including…

Ollie Murray James was born in Marion, Kentucky in 1871. After serving as a Page at the state legislature as a teenager, James decided to enter law and politics. Eventually, he became an important voice, first in state and later in national political…

Born in eastern Kentucky in 1891, William Sandlin rose to national prominence for his military exploits in World War I. Upon returning home, he used his celebrity to raise awareness of the costs of adult illiteracy. His 1949 death was attributed to…

Vertner Woodson Tandy was born in Lexington in 1885. He was the son of Henry A. Tandy, a respected African American mason whose firm contracted to do the brickwork for the Lexington Courthouse, among other prominent buildings. Vertner Tandy attended…

Historical Marker #1692 commemorates the Louisville Memorial Auditorium, which was built to honor those who died in World War I. The Louisville War Memorial Auditorium emerged from a prewar proposal to construct a municipal auditorium that became…

Historical Marker #2457 in Lincoln County commemorates the history of the Stanford Female College, which provided local young women, as well as those from other towns and states, a college education. The Stanford Female Seminary was incorporated…

Historical Marker #2473 commemorates the portion of Boone Trace leaving the relatively level Laurel County area into the mountainous and remote Rockcastle County area which became quite arduous for the Daniel Boone and his trailblazing party during…

Historical Marker #2149 recognizes Ora Frances Porter, an influential figure in Bowling Green’s African-American community, who was among the earliest registered nurses in Kentucky. Born in Butler County in 1880, Porter’s family moved to Bowling…

Historical Marker #1063 commemorates the Old Union Missionary Baptist Church, considered to be the oldest, continuous congregation in Warren County. When the Kentucky Legislature passed an act in 1795 granting each settler the right to own 200 acres…

Historical Marker #2327 is erected on the present day grounds of the First Baptist Church in Garrard County. Organized in 1851, the current church was built in 1871 and was the first Baptist church for the slaves in the county. Pre-dating…

Historical Marker #2273 is located on the lawn of the house that was built by Thomas Buford around 1820. Buford was the son of William Buford, the founder of the county seat of Garrard County, Lancaster. William donated the land for the town, which…

Historical Marker # 2026 is located on highway KY 52 at mile point 11 in Garrard County in commemoration of folk singer Bradley Kincaid. The “Kentucky Mountain Boy” recorded over two hundred songs and published thirteen songbooks during his…

Historical Marker #1942 is erected on the present site of the First Presbyterian Church in Lancaster, Kentucky. Built in 1879, the church was first formed in 1816 with only twenty two members. William O. Bradley, the first Republican Governor of…

Historical Marker # 1733 located about four miles away from the prohibition advocate’s birthplace on Carry Nation Road in Lancaster, Kentucky. Nation was born in Garrard County on November 25, 1846 as Carry Amelia Moore. She and her family moved…

Historical Marker # 1617 is placed at the present Baptist church that was built in 1850, the foundation of which was built from stones of the previous church erected in 1823. Located on Highway 27, about seven miles from Lancaster, the church was…