Camp Dick Robinson

Description

Historical Marker #1750 commemorates Camp Dick Robinson, a Garrard County recruiting camp that was instrumental in keeping Kentucky in the Union.

Established on the farm of Richard Robinson in August 1861 by Union officer and Maysville native William "Bull" Nelson, many of Kentucky's first Union regiments were formed there. The site soon became a staging ground for several early military campaigns.

When the camp was established, Kentucky was attempting to stay neutral in the conflict. Although Governor Beriah Magoffin complained to Abraham Lincoln about the site, Lincoln responded that since the camp "consists exclusively of Kentuckians" and that it was not the "popular wish of Kentucky" to close it, he refused to remove the soldiers.

In 1862, Confederates took the area, renamed the site "Camp Breckinridge," and used it as a supply base. That October, the rebels fell back to Perryville to stay between Union forces and those supplies, which resulted in the Battle of Perryville.

Camp Nelson, established north of Garrard County near Nicholasville, ultimately replaced Camp Dick Robinson. Today, Camp Dick Robinson is remembered for helping solidify the Union cause in Kentucky.

Photos Show

Richard Robinson home, headquarters for Camp Dick Robinson

In August 1861, Union authorities established a recruiting camp on the farm of Richard Robinson, a Garrard County Unionist. Called "Camp Dick Robinson," many of the state's early Union regiments were recruited there. Courtesy of the Kentucky Historical Society.

Preaching at Camp Dick Robinson

Established near Lancaster in August 1861, Camp Dick Robinson was a Union recruiting ground. This image depicts a religious service at the camp. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Cite this Page

Sanders, “Camp Dick Robinson,” ExploreKYHistory, accessed December 21, 2014, http:/​/​explorekyhistory.​ky.​gov/​items/​show/​18.​
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