Explore Warren County, Kentucky

Established in 1796, Warren County is located in southern Kentucky along the Barren River.

Warren County has a rich and diverse history to explore that includes its involvement in the Civil War, being the home of innovator Duncan Hines and much more.

We hope you find this app helpful in exploring the people, places, and stories of Warren County.

Riverview at Hobson Grove

Historical Marker #1127 in Bowling Green commemorates Riverview at Hobson Grove, which was occupied by Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Built on high ground overlooking the Barren River, Riverview at Hobson Grove was the home of wealthy…

Confederate State Capital

Historical Marker #67 in Warren County discusses Bowling Green's role as the state capital of Kentucky's Provisional Confederate government. Few states were as bitterly divided as Kentucky during the Civil War. The commonwealth's…

A Civil War Defense Line

Historical Marker #538 in Warren County commemorates the Union capture of Bowling Green on February 14, 1862. On September 18, 1861, Confederate General Simon Bolivar Buckner and nearly five thousand troops marched on Bowling Green. Capturing the…

Home of Thomas Hines

Historical Marker #769 in Warren County marks the home of lawyer and Civil War captain Thomas Henry Hines. Hines was born in Butler County, Kentucky, on October 9, 1838. While Hines had little formal schooling, his education was acquired outside of…

Warren County

Historical Marker #987 recognizes the formation of Warren County. The twenty-fourth county in order of formation, it is named for Major General Joseph Warren. Born near Boston on June 11, 1741, Warren entered Harvard at age fourteen. He studied…

Bowling Green

Historical Marker #997 in Warren County commemorates the 1798 founding of Bowling Green by Robert Moore. The city of Bowling Green was founded after two brothers, George and Robert Moore, moved to the area from Virginia in 1796. The next year, the…

Civil War Occupations

Historical Marker #1024 in Warren County discusses the occupation of Bowling Green by Union and Confederate forces during the Civil War. Although Kentucky officially adopted a position of neutrality at the beginning of the conflict, the policy…

Home/Office of Duncan Hines

Historical Marker #1831 in Warren County commemorates Duncan Hines. The man behind the legendary cake mix was also known for his series of guidebooks that helped travelers make dining, lodging, and vacation decisions. Hines was born on March 26,…

James T. Morehead

Historical Marker #1882 in Warren County remembers James Turner Morehead, the first native Kentuckian to serve as governor. Born in Bullitt County on May 24, 1797, Morehead was raised in Logan County. After attending local schools, Morehead…

Shake Rag

Historical Marker #2158 in Warren County remembers Shake Rag, an African American community founded in the 1800s. Shake Rag was added to the National Register of Historic Places in September 2000, becoming Bowling Green’s first National Register…

Eliza Calvert Hall, 1856-1935

Historical Marker #2240 in Bowling Green honors Kentucky author and women's suffragist, Eliza (Lida) Calvert (Obenchain) Hall. As an author, Hall wrote primarily short stories, the most well known collection being "Aunt Jane of…

Dr. Lillian South (1879-1966)

Historical Marker #2322 in Bowling Green commemoratesLillian H. South was born in Warren County, Kentucky, in 1879. The daughter of a doctor, she was educated in public schools and graduated from Potter College (now Western Kentucky University) at…

Old Union Missionary Baptist Church

Historical Marker #1063 commemorates the Old Union Missionary Baptist Church, considered to be the oldest, continuous congregation in Warren County. When the Kentucky Legislature passed an act in 1795 granting each settler the right to own 200 acres…

Ora Frances Porter

Historical Marker #2149 recognizes Ora Frances Porter, an influential figure in Bowling Green’s African-American community, who was among the earliest registered nurses in Kentucky. Born in Butler County in 1880, Porter’s family moved to Bowling…