Explore Webster County, Kentucky

Located in north-western Kentucky, Webster County was named for celebrated nineteenth century political statesman Daniel Webster. The county was formed from parts of Henderson, Hopkins, and Union Counties in July 1860. Today, Webster County is bounded by Union, Henderson, Hopkins, McLean, and Crittenden Counties.

Although smaller than the older town of Providence, Dixon, serves as the Webster County seat. Dixon was incorporated in 1861 and was named for Archibald Dixon, a former lieutenant governor and U.S. Senator. Webster County was especially divided during the Civil War, its location near the strategic Ohio and Cumberland Rivers ensured that the county would be well traveled by both the Union army and Confederate raiders. A skirmish that occurred at Burnt Mill in September 1861 is one of the first clashes of arms in the commonwealth. During the twentieth century, Webster County developed its industry largely around oil, coal, agriculture, and railroad businesses. Coal and agriculture have continued to drive the county's economy into the twenty-first century.

The people and places of Webster County have created a fascinating history. Many of these people, places, and events are illustrated on the county's highway markers and examined here. We hope you will use this app to learn more about Webster County's intriguing past.

County Named, 1860

Historical Marker #783 in Dixon—Webster County's county seat—remembers the nineteenth century political giant, Daniel Webster, the county's namesake. Daniel Webster made up one-third of the so-called "Great Triumvirate,"…

Frontier Justice

Historical Marker #1004 in Webster County remembers the brutal statement that was made by posting the head of notorious outlaw Micajah Harpe at a noted crossroads. Harpe's head served as a warning and deterrent for other potential highway…

Encounter at Burnt Mill

Historical Marker #1915 in Webster County notes a September 15, 1861, skirmish between local Confederate-sympathizing militia troops and a Union force. Although Kentucky had officially declared armed neutrality in May 1861, by early September…

Forrest Reconnoitered

Historical Marker #617 in Providence notes the movements of Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry as it passed through Webster County in the fall of 1861. The Kentucky legislature's declaration of allegiance to the Union in September…

Kentucky Authors

Historical Marker #1508 in Dixon remembers the birthplace of noted author Cale Young Rice and his educator brother, Laban Lacy Rice. Kentucky has produced many notable authors who have delivered works in different eras and genres. James Lane Allen,…

Sebree Colored School

Historical Marker #2270 in Sebree remembers that town's school for African American students, which was built in 1938. Like many towns in immediate post-Civil War America, Sebree's existence was due to the railroads. Established in 1868,…