Explore McLean County, Kentucky

McLean County, located in the state’s Western Coal Region, was created in 1854. The county was formed by taking land from three other counties- Daviess, Muhlenberg, and Ohio. The county was named for Judge Alney McLean. He traveled from North Carolina to Kentucky and settled in the McLean County area around the turn of the nineteenth century. Alney McLean became a prominent politician for the area. Other famous Kentuckians connected to McLean County include Charles Hansford, William Worthington, and James Bethel Gresham.

The terrain of McLean County consists of low hills and flat valleys. The Green River runs through the middle of the county. This waterway brought settlers to the area and became an important transportation line with the invention of steamboats and installation of locks along the river. Additionally, the Green River helped build the county’s cities of Calhoun and Rumsey.

Becoming the 103rd county in Kentucky, McLean County holds a rich history from steamboat inventors to Civil War encampments that can be discovered on this tour. We hope you will use this app to better understand the important part McLean County has played in Kentucky's past.

Charles Hansford

Historical marker #1950 in McLean County commemorates the life of Charles Hansford, a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Around 1730, Charles Hansford’s grandfather immigrated to America and settled in King George County, Virginia. In 1759,…

Battle of Sacramento

Historical marker #523 in McLean County recounts the surprise attack by Confederate forces on Union troops near Sacramento, Kentucky. The Battle of Sacramento was Confederate Colonel (later general) Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first significant…

James Bethel Gresham

Historical marker #664 in McLean County commemorates the life and death of James Bethel Gresham, one of the first Americans killed in action during World War I. Gresham was born in McLean County on August 23, 1893. The family lived there until…

Forrest Reconnoitered

Historic marker #665 in McLean County relates the reconnaissance mission Confederate Colonel Nathan B. Forrest led into the area. In the fall of 1861, Federal troops, led by Brigadier General Thomas L. Crittenden, took position in Calhoun. The Union…

William Worthington

Historical marker #1812 in McLean County celebrates the life of William Worthington. On May 7, 1761, Worthington was born in Frederick County, Virginia. He married Mary (Meason) Worthington. In 1784, the couple moved from Virginia to Kentucky. They…

County Named and Calhoun

Historical Marker #1123 in McLean County details the early history and naming of the county and the county’s seat of Calhoun. In 1854, Kentucky established McLean County by combining parts of Daviess, Muhlenberg, and Ohio counties. This county…

Livermore Bridge

Historical marker #892 in McLean County commemorates uniqueness of the Livermore Bridge. The Livermore Bridge does not contain a distinctive architectural structure or a one of a kind design. However, the bridge is like no other bridge in the world.…

Union Camp Site

Historical marker #830 in McLean County commemorates the Union camp site of the 35th Kentucky Infantry. On September 26, 1863, the 35th Kentucky (Union) Infantry was organized at Owensboro, Kentucky. Although the regiment was mounted, it was never…

Rumsey

Historical Marker #1264 in McLean County notes the namesake of the town of Rumsey. Kentucky claims strong ties to the steamboat. Early innovator John Fitch lived his last years in Bardstown, and Fulton and Livingston counties were named for famous…