Explore Oldham County, Kentucky

Tour curated by: Helen McKinney

Oldham county was formed in 1824, and named in honor of Revelotionary War soldier Lt. Col. William Oldham.

Westport was chosen as the county seat in 1823 because of its proximity to the Ohio River and was a bustling river city in the early 1800s. However, by 1838, the courthouse was moved to LaGrange, and it has been the county seat since then.

When the Louisville and Frankfort Railroad Company introduced rail lines in the area in the 1850s, many new towns and communities to sprung up. Eventually the railroad ceased operating as a form of public transportation, but trains still rumble along Main Street through the downtown area daily.

Oldham County has an interesting and diverse history. We hope you will enjoy exploring Oldham County.

Locations for Tour

Historical Marker #182 commemorates the CSA Cemetery in Pewee Valley, which was established in May 1871. In 1904 the Directors of the Pewee Valley Cemetery assigned 11,275 square feet of space to the Commonwealth of Kentucky for use by the Kentucky…

Historical Marker #650 in Crestwood commemorates David Wark Griffith, known to many as an American film pioneer and visionary. He produced the first feature-length motion picture, Birth of a Nation, in 1915. Griffith had a knack for telling a story…

Historical Marker #957 in LaGrange tells of the huge contribution made to education when William M. Funk, son of a farmer and Methodist campground owner of German descent, died in Sept. 1841 at age 27. His will stated, “I wish the sum of $10,000…

Historical Marker #2418 in LaGrange tells the history of the LaGrange Training School and Rosenwald Schools. Prior to 1913, the only funds for black education were those remaining after the collection of taxes in the African American community. The…

Historical Marker #1824 in La Grange tells the history of Oldham County. It became a county in 1824, having been formed from parts of Henry, Jefferson, and Shelby Counties, making it the 74th Kentucky County. The naming of the county is credited…

Historical Marker #208 commemorates the town of Pewee Valley. Originally given as a land grant of 4,000 acres to Ora Norborn Beall in 1784, the area that came to be known as Pewee Valley was formerly known as “Smith’s Station.” Michael and…

Historical Marker #2470 in Brownsboro commemorates Richard James Oglesby, for whom Oldham County was named. Oglesby was born in 1824 in Floydsburg. His father, Col. Jacob Oglesby, was elected Deputy Sheriff in Oldham County. Oglesby represented his…

Historical Marker #909 tells the history of the tiny town of Westport, Kentucky, which has a history that dates far back to when it was first known as Liberty. Native Americans once inhabited the area before the town began as a land grant bestowed…

Historical Marker #2156 in Goshen tells the history of Woodland Farm, originally known as Clifton, and the home that was built by Thomas T. Barbour, early settler of Oldham County, in 1813. It was part of a string of large land tracts settled by…