Hatfields & McCoys

Stops on this tour reveal some of the complicated history of the Hatfield-McCoy feud. From the Civil War backstory and violent clashes to doomed love affairs and courtroom drama, the historical markers dedicated to the feud paint a colorful portrait of a region in transition.

Site of Killing of Asa Harmon McCoy

Historical Marker #2068 marks the location where Asa Harmon McCoy was shot by the Logan Wildcats on January 7, 1865. The younger brother of McCoy patriarch Randolph “Old Ranel” McCoy, Harmon was a Union veteran, who mustered out of service on…

Hog Trial

Historical Marker #2066 commemorates the site of the 1878 Hog Trial and the 1882 election fight (covered in Marker #2047). In the fall of 1878, William “Devil Anse” Hatfield’s cousin, Floyd Hatfield drove his hogs into pens for fattening on the…

Sally McCoy

Historical Marker #2176 tells the story of the doomed love affair between Roseanna McCoy, Randolph’s daughter, and Johnse Hatfield, son of “Devil Anse” and their daughter Sarah Elizabeth (Sally) McCoy who died only a few months after her…

Pawpaw Tree Incident

Historical Marker #2047 marks the site of the notorious pawpaw tree incident in 1882.   The violence of the pawpaw tree incident grew from a spark ignited by an election-day altercation between Tolbert McCoy, a son of Randolph “Old Ranel” McCoy,…

Site of Randolph McCoy House

Historical Marker #2062 is at the site of the original Randolph McCoy home on Blackberry Creek, which was burned on January 1, 1888, during a Hatfield raid. Randolph and his wife Sarah subsequently moved to Pikeville where he operated a ferry. The…

McCoy Cemetery

Historical Marker #2067 marks the McCoy Cemetery where three of Randolph McCoy’s sons—Tolbert, Pharmer, and Randolph, Jr. are buried. All three brothers, as well as Alifair and Calvin McCoy were killed by Hatfields in various incidents. Tolbert,…

Frank and Nancy McCoy Phillips

Historical Marker #2434 is dedicated to Frank and Nancy McCoy Phillips. “Bad” Frank Phillips was appointed by the Kentucky governor to arrest members of the Hatfield family. Phillip’s appointment followed the resumption of violence in the…

McCoy House

Marker #2145 marks Randolph and Sarah McCoy’s home in Pikeville, where they moved after their Blackberry Creek home was burned in 1888 (covered on marker #2062).  Perry Cline, a Pikeville lawyer and distant relative of the McCoys who had a past…

Pike County Courthouse and Jail

Historical Marker #1866 marks the Pike County Courthouse and Jail, where members of the Hatfield family were tried and found guilty of the murders of Tolbert, Randolph, Jr., Pharmer, Alifair, and Calvin McCoy. In September 1889, the bloody results of…

Feudists on Trial

Historical Marker #1913 commemorates one of the last incidents in the Hatfield-McCoy feud. Ellison Mounts, a poor twenty-five-year-old who took part in the raid of the McCoy’s home in 1888, was found guilty of the murder of Alifair McCoy (event…

McCoy Graves Here

Historical Marker #1728 marks Dils Cemetery in Pikeville. Dils Cemetery is the resting place of Randolph and Sarah McCoy, as well as their daughter, Roseanna, son, Sam, and Sam’s wife, Martha.  Each of these McCoys had their lives shaped by the…

Col. John Dils, Jr.

Historical Marker #2489 commemorates the life of Colonel John Dils, Jr. John Dils, Jr. was one of the most successful men in antebellum Pike County. Upon arriving in the region from northern Virginia around 1840, Dils spent some time as a…