Kentucky's National Register of Historic Places

This state-wide tour includes nearly thirty markers of Kentucky sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The National Register of Historic Places is the nation's official list of historic and archaeological resources deemed worthy of preservation. Administered by the National Park Service and state historic preservation offices (in Kentucky, the Kentucky Heritage Council), the National Register recognizes districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects significant in American history, architecture, archaeology, engineering and culture. This federal program was launched under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate and protect our historic and archaeological resources.

The Kentucky Heritage Council's National Register Program has been widely successful and has achieved nationwide recognition. Kentucky has the fourth-highest number of listings (following New York, Massachusetts and Ohio) - with more than 3,400 districts, sites and structures encompassing more than 42,000 historic features.

Kentucky's buildings and sites listed in the National Register of Historic Places are distinguished by having been documented and evaluated according to uniform standards. The benefits of inclusion in the National Register include recognition that a property is of significance to the nation, state or community, consideration in the planning of federal or federally funded projects and eligibility for federal and state tax benefits.

The National Register of Historic Places website includes a searchable database of included assets and is publically accessible. Visit this site to learn more about the significance of the sites on this tour. The database is an excellent resource for those wanting to learn more about specific districts, sites and structures.

Birthplace of Carry A. Nation

Historical Marker # 1733 is located about four miles from the prohibition advocate’s birthplace on Carry Nation Road in Lancaster, Kentucky. Nation was born in Garrard County on November 25, 1846 as Carry Amelia Moore. She and her family moved from…

Abner Gaines House

Historical Marker #1765 in Walton commemorates the Abner Gaines House, which was used as an inn and stagecoach stop on the first stagecoach line that ran between Cincinnati and Lexington. A member of the prominent Gaines family, Abner Gaines (b.…

U.S. Marine Hospital

Marker #2569 in Louisville commemorates the U.S. Marine Hospital constructed between 1845 and 1852. Located in the Portland area adjacent to downtown Louisville, the hospital stands facing both Interstate 64 and, beyond that, the Ohio River.…

Jack Jouett House

Marker #1541 in Woodford County commemorates the Jack Jouett House, built by the Revolutionary figure who rode all night to warn Thomas Jefferson and other Virginia legislators that British troops were coming to capture them. John “Jack” Jouett, Jr.…

Falls City Jeans & Woolen Mills/Kentucky Jeans

Historical Marker #2588 commemorates the Falls City Jean and Woolen Mill in Louisville, Kentucky. The Falls City Jeans and Woolen Company was incorporated 1882. The building was completed around 1886. The Industrial Revolution was going strong…

Woodland Farm

Historical Marker #2156 in Goshen tells the history of Woodland Farm, originally known as Clifton, and the home that was built by Thomas T. Barbour, early settler of Oldham County, in 1813. It was part of a string of large land tracts settled by…

Union College

Historical marker #2054 in Knox County notes the founding and history of Union College. Incorporated in October 1879, this small, private college in Knox County is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. The college was formed by a group of…

Traveler’s Rest

Historical Markers #95 and #2233 in Lincoln County remember Traveler's Rest, the home of Isaac Shelby, Kentucky's first and fifth governor. Shelby was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1750. As a young man he moved with his family to…

The Cedars

Historical Marker #1602 marks one of the oldest brick houses in Grayson County. The transitional Greek Revival house located in Rogers Springs was built in 1847 by Benjamin Lone Rogers. Rogers was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, in 1812 to Joseph…

St. Paul's Church

Historical Marker #1151 in Newport notes the significance of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, which has served the community since 1844. The St. Paul's congregation was formed nearly seventy years after the first Episcopal missionary, Rev.…

Shelby Park Neighborhood

Historical Marker #2396 commemorates the Shelby Park Neighborhood, one of the areas in Louisville that was originally populated by German immigrants. This area of the city received one of the later waves of immigrants. In 1847, the upper third of…

Scott County Jail and Jailer's House

Historical Marker #2605 remembers the Scott County Jail and Jailer’s House located in Scott County, Ky. Scott County, like many small communities in Kentucky, has a long history. But unlike many areas, Scott County has been able to preserve a…

Sally McCoy

Historical Marker #2176 tells the story of the doomed love affair between Roseanna McCoy, Randolph’s daughter, and Johnse Hatfield, son of “Devil Anse” and their daughter Sarah Elizabeth (Sally) McCoy who died only a few months after her birth. The…

Roebling Suspension Bridge

Historical Marker #1601 in Kenton County commemorates the Roebling Suspension Bridge, the first bridge to span the Ohio River. Opened to traffic on January 1, 1867, the bridge was the longest suspension bridge in the world at the time. The cost of…

Rhea Stadium

Historical marker #2601 commemorates Rhea Stadium in Russellville, Kentucky, which was named for local and state political figure, Thomas S. Rhea. Rhea Stadium, home of the Russellville Panthers, was built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA)…

Pike County Courthouse and Jail

Historical Marker #1866 marks the Pike County Courthouse and Jail, where members of the Hatfield family were tried and found guilty of the murders of Tolbert, Randolph, Jr., Pharmer, Alifair, and Calvin McCoy. In September 1889, the bloody results of…

Montgomery Street School

Whether known as the Montgomery Street School, the Emma Dolfinger School, the Portland Christian School, or simply "The Dolfinger," this building has played central parts in the Portland neighborhood and broader Kentucky history. For more than 160…

McCormack Christian Church

Historical Marker #1590 in Lincoln County commemorates McCormack Christian Church, one of the longest practicing congregations in the county. When the early setters came to what became Kentucky, many believed that it was as important to bring their…

Maxwell Place

Given to the University of Kentucky by the class of 2000, Historical Marker #2069 commemorates Maxwell Place. It was built in 1870-72 for Judge James H. Mulligan as a wedding gift from his father, Dennis Mulligan, who was an active and influential…

Executive Mansion

Historical Marker #2229 in Frankfort commemorates Kentucky's Executive Mansion, the state’s second governor's residence. In 1911, Governor Augustus E. Wilson recommended that a new governor's mansion be built near the new capitol…

James & Amanda Mount Home / J.C. Barnett Library and Archive

Historical Marker #2536 relates the history of the James and Amanda Malvina Railey Mount Home, which now serves as the J.C. Barnett Library and Archives in LaGrange.The Mounts were a leading family in antebellum Oldham County and Amanda and James…

First Lutheran Church

Historical Marker #2529 commemorates the vibrant history of the First English Lutheran Church of Louisville. Established by fourteen founding members in 1872, the church set out to practice their religion in English in a thoroughly German portion of…

Elmwood Hall

Elmwood Hall Thomas D. and Sally Carneal built this classical villa from 1818-20, facing the Ohio River on a 968+ acre farm. In 1827, Wm. Bullock of London purchased the estate and planned a garden-town called Hygeia. It failed. In…

Eades Tavern

Marker #1824 describes Eades Tavern, one of the oldest surviving buildings in Paris. It has served as tavern, post office, school, and private home. Thomas Eades built the log portion of Eades Tavern around 1795. The first travelers who stopped at…

Colville Covered Bridge

Historical Marker #1566 in Bourbon County tells about the county's last remaining covered bridge, which is one of the few remaining in the state. The Colville Covered Bridge was constructed in 1877 by Jacob Bower of the Bower Bridge Company of…

Cheapside Slave Auction Block

Historical Marker #2122 remembers Lexington’s Cheapside slave auction block and the thousands of enslaved Kentuckians sold here. For decades before the Civil War, Lexington was the center of the slave trade in Kentucky. Located in the heart of the…

Adair County Courthouse

Historical Marker #1599 in Columbia notes the location of the historic Adair County courthouse. Town life in Kentucky’s small communities used to be centered on the local courthouse square. People attended "court days" to conduct…